Broadway Plan

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Elevated view looking west along Broadway.

The Phase 2 Virtual Open House Is Now Closed

In March 2019, we launched a planning process to create a comprehensive community plan for the area within Vine Street to Clark Drive and 1st Avenue to 16th Avenue. The 30-year plan will focus on opportunities to integrate new housing, jobs, and amenities around the new Broadway Subway. This webpage provides a one-stop location where you can learn about the Broadway Plan, provide your feedback and stay up to date on engagement opportunities.


This Virtual Open House for Phase 2 Emerging Directions that ran between February 16 and March 31 is now closed. We are now summarizing what we heard and will be publishing a Phase 2 Emerging Directions Engagement Summary in the coming months. We will be using this information to inform the "Phase 3 Refined Directions" which will be the next stage of our work plan. We will be updating this website with more opportunities to engage on the Broadway Plan as the work plan progresses.


Click on the section or neighbourhood you would like to learn about. Once there you can:

  • View the interactive StoryMap giving a highlight of information
  • Explore the linked materials (boards and neighbourhood profiles) for more detailed information
  • Ask a question or leave a comment and we'll respond within two business days

Provide your feedback

  • Review the "Updates" tab below for other opportunities to get involved

The Phase 2 Virtual Open House Is Now Closed

In March 2019, we launched a planning process to create a comprehensive community plan for the area within Vine Street to Clark Drive and 1st Avenue to 16th Avenue. The 30-year plan will focus on opportunities to integrate new housing, jobs, and amenities around the new Broadway Subway. This webpage provides a one-stop location where you can learn about the Broadway Plan, provide your feedback and stay up to date on engagement opportunities.


This Virtual Open House for Phase 2 Emerging Directions that ran between February 16 and March 31 is now closed. We are now summarizing what we heard and will be publishing a Phase 2 Emerging Directions Engagement Summary in the coming months. We will be using this information to inform the "Phase 3 Refined Directions" which will be the next stage of our work plan. We will be updating this website with more opportunities to engage on the Broadway Plan as the work plan progresses.


Click on the section or neighbourhood you would like to learn about. Once there you can:

  • View the interactive StoryMap giving a highlight of information
  • Explore the linked materials (boards and neighbourhood profiles) for more detailed information
  • Ask a question or leave a comment and we'll respond within two business days

Provide your feedback

  • Review the "Updates" tab below for other opportunities to get involved

Do you have a question about the Broadway Plan?

The Broadway Plan team is happy to answer any questions you may have about process, timelines or engagement. Please send us a question and we'll get back to you within one business day.

Note: If you have a question about the Broadway Subway, please contact the Province of British Columbia's project team which is responsible for the station design and construction. If you would like more information about the Broadway Subway Project visit broadwaysubway.ca or email broadwaysubway@gov.bc.ca 

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What's the range of net new housing supply being considered for station areas? In the previous survey a 15,000 units target was mentioned. Why is this so low? Considering the broadway subway is one of the biggest opportunities for TOD in Vancouver for many decades to come, and this is a 30 year plan, why are we being so low on the housing targets?

    Rob100 asked 2 months ago

    Hello Rob,

    We have not published any projections for areas along the subway to date. We anticipate sharing housing and job projections as part of the Phase 3 Refined Directions engagement later this summer. We hope you'll take the time to review and share your thoughts when this information is available. Thank you for your question.

    Best,

    Andrew

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    Good evening. I live on the south east corner of quebec street and broadway. My question to you is the city planning to widen the road on Quebec Street? Currently it's a one way street leading on to Broadway with a bike lane and street parking. Thank you, Jim

    Always jim asked 2 months ago

    Hi Jim, 

    Thank you for your question.

    The City is not planning to widen Quebec St between Broadway and the lane south. However, Quebec St will be reconstructed to accommodate the ventilation grilles and emergency exit on the east side. To improve circulation and provide 2-way access along Quebec St between Broadway and the lane to the south, parking will need to be removed on at least one-side of the street. 

     Best regards, 

    Broadway Plan Team

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    In response to Marc's question, you say that social housing is housing with rents set as no more than 30% of a tenants income. I thought that the City of Vancouver has redefined 'social housing' to mean that 70% of the rental units in a project can be market rental with rents set by the market and only 30% of the units with rents set 'below market'. Can you please clarify what is meant by 'social housing' in the City of Vancouver?

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello,

    The Housing Vancouver Strategy and the Zoning and Development bylaw defines social housing as:

     "The City of Vancouver Zoning and Development By-Law defines social housing as rental housing:

    • In which at least 30 per cent of the dwelling units are occupied by households with incomes below housing income limits, as set out in the current “Housing Income Limits” table published by BC Housing

    • Which is owned by a non-profit corporation, by a non-profit co-operative association, or by or on behalf of the city, the Province of British Columbia, or Canada

    • Is secured by a housing agreement or other legal commitment In the Downtown Eastside, social housing is rental housing in which at least one third of the dwelling units are occupied by persons eligible for either Income Assistance or a combination of basic Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement and are rented at rates no higher than the shelter component of Income Assistance."

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    You say that you have no actual numbers that are being considered for increases in housing and jobs. How can we decide whether your proposals are appropriate if we have no idea of how many new housing units you are thinking of allowing? For example, if we need 5000 more new housing units along the corridor to meet the goal of more housing choices and existing zoned capacity is for 6000 more housing units, then there is no need for new zoning capacity beyond what is already present. If the opposite is the case, then we will need to increase zoning capacity beyond what is already present. Without those sorts of numbers, the public is working in a vacuum.

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello,

    The Broadway Plan policy will certainly be informed by housing and job projections. We anticipate that information being released as part of the Phase 3 Refining Directions Engagement in July 2021. Thank you for your continued engagement on the Broadway Plan.

    Best,

    Andrew

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    Hi there. I live in Fairview. I was wondering if there are any plans to sink the powerlines here below ground? They are a real eyesore and an obstacle to planting more trees to prove the quality of life here in the neighbourhood. Many thanks Dan

    Dan84 asked 4 months ago

    Hello Dan, 

    Thank you for your question. 

    BC Hydro and the City have been working towards undergrounding the utilities where feasible through the redevelopment process where opportunities arise. Undergrounding of utilities outside of the redevelopment process is costly and impactful. Also the undergrounding of utilities in a developed area isn’t always feasible because of the underground space required for duct banks and manholes and the above ground space for pad mounted transformers. Lastly, undergrounding of utility lines can create more limitations for planting trees because trees cannot be planted near underground utilities and the excavation required to underground utilities can result damage or remove trees.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    I understand why a Subway is useful for people who want to live in a larger more affordable housing space in locations like Coquitlam or Maple Ridge and then travel a long distance quickly to get into the City. I don't understand how the Subway is very useful to people who live in a location along the corridor that is a number of blocks from a subway station who want to get to a job somewhere like Central Broadway or VGH. If someone lives at, for example, 15th and Cypress, it is not very convenient to walk to the nearest Subway station at Granville and Broadway just to take the time to go down below grade to the subway tracks and then go a couple of stops to Broadway and Cambie. And if they want to go downtown, it is even more inconvenient since they will have to change lines. Wouldn't a bus running on the surface be faster and easier? You have said that you want people living in the Broadway corridor to be able to walk or roll in order to shop and work. So how is the Subway needed or useful to these people?

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello, 

    When planning out a comprehensive transportation system, we try to accommodate all of the different trips that are made within an area. For the Broadway area, some trips start or end elsewhere in the City and region, while other trips remain internal to the area. That is why our objective is to provide complete walking, cycling, and transit networks. These different networks will benefit different types of trips. Shorter trips will benefit from walking and cycling improvements and longer trips will benefit from cycling and transit improvements, including the Subway. 

     You are absolutely right that the Subway will be valuable for people living further east, which tends to be more affordable than the Broadway area, and wanting to travel to the Broadway area. This includes people within Vancouver, and not just our neighbouring cities. The Subway will also make some trips between the Broadway area and Downtown faster, especially for trips that are start/end within the eastern part of Fairview neighbourhood and within the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood. The transfer between the Broadway Subway and the Canada Line will also be convenient, as it will be done underground.  

     Thank you for your question. If you have any further questions on the Broadway Subway Project, please visit the Province’s website (broadwaysubway.ca) or contact them at broadwaysubway@gov.bc.ca.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    What will happen to the results of the current survey and the comments that people make.? Will these be made public so everyone can read what other people think? Making them all public will lead to more understanding of other people's points of view and will lead to better more informed conversations. The transparent process that occurs during a Public Hearing is the kind of process that the Shape Your city website should be aiming for.

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello,

    The results of the survey are going to be made public and included in the Phase 2 Engagement Summary Report. We're hoping to publish this report by late spring or early summer. We certainly agree that sharing this information is important to keeping the public informed.

    Thank you for writing to us,

    Andrew

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    The Covid pandemic has resulted in some trends that will likely, according to many urban commentators, remain permanent. These are - working some or all the time from home; the desire of many people for more space inside their homes to allow for work space, and for private green space outside, and a decline in demand for office space possibly even leading to recycling of some commercial space into residential. In what way do your proposed guiding principles incorporate these likely future trends?

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello again,

    The COVID pandemic has certainly influenced how we think about cities in the future. However, the lasting impact of some of the "trends" are still up for debate. Many technical experts, stakeholders and community leaders aren't certain which COVID "trends" will be permanent or not just yet. That being said, over the last year, we've learned that COVID actually reinforces many of the guiding principles. The last year has shown that we need a robust public realm that provides plenty of room to both gather, walk, cycling and or roll through. It has also reinforced that we need a resilient and diverse economy that supports a range of employment opportunities (especially small businesses). Another example is the need for affordable, diverse, equitable and inclusive complete neighbourhoods. 

    Best,

    Andrew




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    You say in my your response to an earlier question, that this phase of the process is to get feedback to determine whether you are on the right track. What kind of feedback would you need in order to result in any significant changes to what you are proposing?

    j pierce asked 4 months ago

    Hello,

    We use a mix method approach to engaging with the broader community and stakeholders. We use our survey results, focused meeting with stakeholder groups, and feedback from the public to help inform, shape, and modify the emerging policy direction. The best way for you and your neighbours to help the ongoing policy development is to participate in the various engagement opportunities that we host as the project progresses. Some of these opportunities may include: completing the survey, participating in workshops, and sending emails/letters. 

    Thank you kindly,

    Andrew

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    How come the Broadway Plan isn’t focused on attracting good, high-paying jobs into the City? If there were better jobs, you wouldn’t be taxing to death the smart ones that could get good careers (excluding the > 1400 making 6 figures at City Hall) in order to support the ones that don’t make an effort with subsidized housing in areas I can’t afford.

    Sue Do asked 4 months ago

    Hello Sue,


    Thank you for your feedback. The Broadway Plan is focused on helping to attract a diverse range of paying jobs (including high paying jobs) over the next 30 years. The early policy directions found on page 59 in our boards highlight some ways which we hope to do so. The boards can be found here: https://syc.vancouver.ca/projects/broadway-plan/broadway-plan-emerging-directions-open-house-boards.pdf 


    As referenced on the "At Work" board: The City has recently completed a comprehensive study on the likely demand for employment space over the next 30 years. The Employment Lands and Economy Review found that by 2051, city-wide, there will be demand for: 

    • 35,700 to 66,000 office jobs 
    • 1,600 to 4,000 hotel jobs 
    • 26,800 to 49,100 retail/ commercial jobs (e.g. restaurants, personal services)
    • 5,300 to 8,900 industrial jobs 


    The opportunity for Broadway is immense. Broadway is one of the top destinations for the development of new employment spaces in the entire region, second only to the Central Business District in Downtown Vancouver. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the fundamentals that drive a positive long-term outlook for employment space demand are present in the Broadway area; such as a central location, high-calibre educational institutions, proximity to a large and diverse rental housing stock and the upcoming Broadway Subway extension. 


    I would encourage you to review the board reference above to learn more details about how the Broadway Plan will continue to build a strong foundation for Vancouver's future prosperity.

    Best,

    Andrew