Broadway Plan

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Elevated view looking west along Broadway.

In March 2019, we launched a planning process to create a comprehensive community plan for the area within Vine Street to Clark Drive and 1st Avenue to 16th Avenue. The 30-year plan will focus on opportunities to integrate new housing, jobs, and amenities around the new Broadway Subway. This webpage provides a one-stop location where you can learn about the Broadway Plan and stay up to date on engagement opportunities.



Broadway Plan Approved By City Council


The Broadway Plan has been approved by Vancouver City Council on June 22. Download the full Broadway Plan PDF file (83 MB). Council's amendments can be reviewed here. The Broadway Plan will go into effect September 1, 2022 .


A summary of public and stakeholder engagement from Phase 1 to Phase 4 is now available. Download the document here (2.4 MB). Detailed engagement summaries by phase can be found in the "Documents" section on this page.


Read a summary of the Broadway Plan here:


Formal rezoning letters of enquiry (LOEs) or rezoning applications will not be processed prior to September 1. Applicants may continue to contact the Broadway Plan Team staff (broadwayplan@vancouver.ca) with questions. We ask that these questions focus on interpretation or clarification of Plan policy. Please note that staff will be responding to questions primarily through email. We aim to provide an initial response within 5 business days.


In March 2019, we launched a planning process to create a comprehensive community plan for the area within Vine Street to Clark Drive and 1st Avenue to 16th Avenue. The 30-year plan will focus on opportunities to integrate new housing, jobs, and amenities around the new Broadway Subway. This webpage provides a one-stop location where you can learn about the Broadway Plan and stay up to date on engagement opportunities.



Broadway Plan Approved By City Council


The Broadway Plan has been approved by Vancouver City Council on June 22. Download the full Broadway Plan PDF file (83 MB). Council's amendments can be reviewed here. The Broadway Plan will go into effect September 1, 2022 .


A summary of public and stakeholder engagement from Phase 1 to Phase 4 is now available. Download the document here (2.4 MB). Detailed engagement summaries by phase can be found in the "Documents" section on this page.


Read a summary of the Broadway Plan here:


Formal rezoning letters of enquiry (LOEs) or rezoning applications will not be processed prior to September 1. Applicants may continue to contact the Broadway Plan Team staff (broadwayplan@vancouver.ca) with questions. We ask that these questions focus on interpretation or clarification of Plan policy. Please note that staff will be responding to questions primarily through email. We aim to provide an initial response within 5 business days.


Do you have a question about the Broadway Plan?

The Broadway Plan team is happy to answer any questions you may have about process, timelines or engagement. Please send us a question and we'll get back to you within one business day.

Note: If you have a question about the Broadway Subway, please contact the Province of British Columbia's project team which is responsible for the station design and construction. If you would like more information about the Broadway Subway Project visit broadwaysubway.ca or email broadwaysubway@gov.bc.ca 

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Hi, I own a business at 528 West Broadway and was speaking with a few people over there about my moving out on Monday the 25th, needing street access for my truck. I'm not sure who is now my contact, is someone able to contact me asap? Thank you

    Michael Levine asked 17 days ago

    Hello Michael,

    Thank you for writing to us. This sounds like it is related to the construction of the Broadway Subway (that is being lead by the province). Please contact my colleague Vania (email: vania.tse@vancouver.ca) in the City's Rapid Transit Office. She can help you out.

    Best,

    Andrew



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    Why is there so much emphasis in the City of Vancouver on high-rise (luxury) residential buildings? I am someone who is not interested in living higher than the 7th floor. I also don't need (or want to pay extra for) "luxury" appliances and finishes.

    Verni Brown asked about 2 months ago

    Hello Verni,

    Thanks for the question. The main focus of the Broadway Plan is to place more emphasis on planning rental units. Two-thirds (~66%) of all units will be non market, market, and below market unit. Only one-third (~33%) of units will be ownership.


    Hope this helps,

    The Broadway Plan Team

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    Hi there, three questions: 1 - how does the density increase in the Fairview area intersect with the Senakw-Squamish First Nation development in terms of public transit and amenities such as libraries, schools, parks? https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/senakw-squamish-first-nation-vancouver-rental-housing-development Second - where will/can co-ops be built? There seem to be no mention of co-ops in the Broadway Plan. Third - given that the Broadway Plan reaches nine + blocks north from Broadway in the Fairview district, why is there no increased density in Shaughnessy which is only seven blocks south of Broadway, and very close to the new Granville and Broadway Skytrain station?

    JayMor asked 3 months ago

    Hi there,

    The Broadway Plan's Public Benefits Strategy looked at the needs of the area and surrounding area to consider future needs over the 30 year time period of the plan. The City’s funding capacity, emerging opportunities, and the evolving needs of the Broadway area and city as a whole will help determine the actual package of amenities and infrastructure that can be funded and delivered. The PBS will be reviewed and evaluated periodically and integrated into the City’s overall capital planning (the 10-year Capital Strategic Outlook, four-year Capital Plan, and annual Capital Budget) which prioritize projects and funding on a city-wide level. Its outlined a $1.1billion package that reflects the amenity and service needs of the area over the first ten years this includes parks, libraries, affordable housing, childcare, community facilities, utilities, transportation and streets. If you'd like to read a summary of whats included please read:  https://syc.vancouver.ca/projects/broadway-plan/broadway-plan-summary-highlight-document.pdf?_ga=2.179983331.639170547.1652726337-1718293895.1651706529 

    With respect to co-ops, they are mentioned throughout the plan in the land use section as well as housing chapter. Policy directions include:

    • Support renewal of existing, aging non-market (supportive, social and co-operative) housing to improve liveability, expand  affordability, increase stock, and create opportunities for new non-market housing in all neighbourhoods in the Plan area. 

    Social housing policy direction regarding co-ops:

    • Enable existing and newly acquired social housing sites, including non-profit co-operatives and supportive housing, to renew and expand the number of social housing units through consideration of additional height and density generally up to the maximum permitted by the policy area’s respective land use policies in new developments that provide 100 per cent of residential floor area as social housing, recognizing that projects may need to include a market housing component to assist with project viability


    Housing partnerships and monitoring policy regarding co-ops:

    • Expand the delivery of and deepen affordability in supportive, social, co-operative and below-market rental housing in the Broadway Plan area beyond the units and affordability requirements outlined through Plan policy to further address city-wide need.  


    When the Broadway Plan's terms of reference were approved by Council in 2019, the study area boundaries were determined by considering areas up to 800m from existing and future transit stations. 800m is approximately a 10min walk, which is commonly accepted as a reasonable walking distance to fast, frequent and reliable transit services such as SkyTrain. Area's outside of the Broadway Plan will be shaped through the ongoing Vancouver Plan and future planning exercises.


    Hope this helps,

    Andrew 

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    What was the reason for drawing the boundary of the plan at 16th Ave. Residences south of 16th are large and have a lower population density. This area should be rezoned. The proximity to the downtown core via Granville presents opportunities and would revitalize the South Granville neighbourhood. 16th is only 6 blocks from Broadway, it seems like a missed opportunity and an easy area to develop in terms of impact and displacement. I'm not against development and the Broadway core needs a plan but I fear the city is not expanding in areas that are prime for development. It's absurd to have mega-mansions this close to the core.

    Kgkg asked 3 months ago

    Hello kgkg,


    Thanks for the question - its a good one. The study area boundaries were determined by considering areas up to 800m from existing and future transit stations. 800m is approximately a 10min walk, which is commonly accepted as a reasonable walking distance to fast, frequent and reliable transit services such as SkyTrain. We'd also like to flag that the on going Vancouver Plan and future planning studies will also help to guide growth and change outside the study area.

    Hope this helps,

    Andrew

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    Hi there, regarding MRTB planning board; it states the option to build secure rental. This means condos will not be considered or they will at a much lower FSR? Will CACs be waived for secure rental including 20% social/affordable in the same manner as DCLs are currently? Love the plan, Thanks!

    Steve Da Cruz asked 3 months ago

    Hi Steve,

    I would recommend you wait for the Draft Plan for further and most up to date details. The plan and council report will be shared in the next week.

    Best,

    The Broadway Plan team

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    On many blocks the map shows the first 4 lots on avenues abutting Fraser street being rezoned for high rise residential, while the immediately adjacent lots remain low density (for example see the 600 block of E 13th, immediately west of Fraser). Moreover, no upgrades to Fraser itself are imagined even though this stretch has very narrow sidewalks already. Does this map accurately convey the recommendations of the plan — to build 18 storey towers on Fraser immediately abutting low density residential which cannot in turn benefit from density increases, and without even a laneway of physical separation? If not, why doesn’t the plan anticipate rezoning entire blocks, reconfiguring or zoning intermediate density transition zones in these areas, as is done nearly everywhere else in the city and the plan?

    Okurisama asked 5 months ago

    Hello Okurisama,

    The draft Broadway Plan proposes building heights up to 18 storeys along Fraser Street for mixed-use market and below-market rental with ground floor commercial uses. The intent is to enable new affordable rental housing in this select area and transform Fraser Street over time into a mixed-use high street, offering more shops and services in an area that currently lacks these. While this area is further away from rapid transit stations, the #8 Fraser bus is on the frequent transit network and there are also buses that run along Kingsway and Broadway (#9 will still run in the future) just to the north and south, which collectively offer a variety of transit connections to the area. 

    With new development along Fraser Street sidewalks would be widened and new rear lanes would be added to service buildings where they are currently missing (also providing separation from higher density development on Fraser with adjacent lower scale buildings. East and west of Fraser the draft Plan would enable 6-storey rental apartments. More detailed transportation and public realm planning for Fraser Street will occur as a priority implementation action for the Plan to ensure the street can comfortably accommodate more people walking and living in the area.

    From public engagement we have heard some concerns about the proposed scale of change along Fraser Street, so staff are also exploring a 6-storey mixed-use market rental option (no below-market units) along Fraser to provide choice and variety in building scales.

    Best,

    The Broadway Plan team

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    Why is Fraser between Broadway and Kingsway planned to host high rise towers when this section of Fraser is one of the farthest portions of the study area from any rapid transit station (especially south of 12th), if not the farthest. This seems to be in direct contradiction to the General Approach to Height and Density section of the draft plan. I am all for activating the street but the proposed scale is wildly different from the local status quo and not at all supported by adjacent infrastructure (no nearby transit station, and extremely narrow streets/sidewalks on both Fraser and 12th in the immediate vicinity).

    Cwn asked 5 months ago

    Hi Cwn,

    The draft Broadway Plan proposes building heights up to 18 storeys along Fraser Street for mixed-use market and below-market rental with ground floor commercial uses. The intent is to enable new affordable rental housing in this select area and transform Fraser Street over time into a mixed-use high street, offering more shops and services in an area that currently lacks these. While this area is further away from rapid transit stations, the #8 Fraser bus is on the frequent transit network and there are also buses that run along Kingsway and Broadway (#9 will still run in the future) just to the north and south, which collectively offer a variety of transit connections to the area. 

    With new development along Fraser Street sidewalks would be widened and new rear lanes would be added to service buildings where they are currently missing (also providing separation from higher density development on Fraser with adjacent lower scale buildings. East and west of Fraser the draft Plan would enable 6-storey rental apartments. More detailed transportation and public realm planning for Fraser Street will occur as a priority implementation action for the Plan to ensure the street can comfortably accommodate more people walking and living in the area.

    From public engagement we have heard some concerns about the proposed scale of change along Fraser Street, so staff are also exploring a 6-storey mixed-use market rental option (no below-market units) along Fraser to provide choice and variety in building scales.

    Best,

    The Broadway Plan Team

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    If there's only 2 towers per block in the RM areas, doesn't that suggest there's a ''rush'' for sellers and buyers to transact in order to get max density? How will the City address overbidding and speculation tied to the 2 tower limit? Thank you very much

    Peter09 asked 5 months ago

    Hi Peter,

    In the RM residential areas the proposed height and density for market and below-market rental towers has been carefully calibrated to provide a long term path for renewal and redevelopment of larger aging rental buildings nearing the end of their life and facing significant costs in renovations and upgrades, without incentivizing redevelopment in the short term. In most cases rental building owners will choose to continue maintaining and renovating their existing rental buildings for many years. The plan policy enables another option for building owners where the upgrade costs may be comparable to redevelopment, and in choosing redevelopment the existing affordability would be maintained with the 20% below market units, and with enhanced protections for existing tenants. These areas also have an option for redevelopment with 6-storey market rental buildings (with the same enhanced tenant protections). The two towers per block limit is intended to help ensure incremental change in these areas, access to light and air for existing residents, and a variety in building heights as redevelopment does happen. We do not expect a rush of applications in these areas to redevelop in the short term.

    Best,

    The Broadway Plan team

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    Hi, For the residential areas that are noted as having two towers per block maximum I'm curious what is the expected reaction from developers. In a previous note it seems the planning intent is to ensure incremental change for those areas, however the policy may instead create a race to develop for fear of not being able to develop at a later date. I suspect the planning department will get a crush of applications all trying to be first or second for their block. Any strategies to mitigate this?

    Fomo asked 5 months ago

    Hi fomo,

    In the RM residential areas the proposed height and density for market and below-market rental towers has been carefully calibrated to provide a long term path for renewal and redevelopment of larger aging rental buildings nearing the end of their life and facing significant costs in renovations and upgrades, without incentivizing redevelopment in the short term. In most cases rental building owners will choose to continue maintaining and renovating their existing rental buildings for many years. The plan policy enables another option for building owners where the upgrade costs may be comparable to redevelopment, and in choosing redevelopment the existing affordability would be maintained with the 20% below market units, and with enhanced protections for existing tenants. These areas also have an option for redevelopment with 6-storey market rental buildings (with the same enhanced tenant protections). The two towers per block limit is intended to help ensure incremental change in these areas, access to light and air for existing residents, and a variety in building heights as redevelopment does happen. We do not expect a rush of applications in these areas to redevelop in the short term.

    The Broadway Plan Team

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    With the densification that City staff is seeking, access to public parks will be vital for residents' enjoyment, social interaction, recreation, connection with nature etc. etc. You discuss renewal and expansion of existing parks and name Jonathan Rogers Park and Guelph Park, but are silent about plans for Delamont Park. In the Broadway Plan's Phase 2 emerging directions online information boards (Feb 2021), staff specifically mentioned Delamont and how the city/park board had been acquiring lands for Delamont Park over the last 40 years. Yet, the final phase of the Broadway Plan is silent about Delamont Park. What are your plans for Delamont? If you plan to expand it, it should be one of the "larger parks" to which solar access requirements apply. Right now, you don't mention Delamont on the "Sunlight on Parks and School Yards" board so I assume you consider it one of the smaller "greenway parks" to which solar access requirements will not apply?

    concernedkits asked 5 months ago

    Hello concernedkits,

    Thank you for your question about Delamont Park.

    In previous rounds of Broadway Plan engagement, we mentioned the Park Board’s plans to expand Delamont Park. Over the past five decades the City has acquired properties for park purposes on 5th and 6th avenues between Arbutus and Maple streets. These properties include 15 sites on the Heritage Register (one Heritage A, two Heritage B, and 12 Heritage C). The Park Board anticipates launching the master planning process including robust community engagement to explore ideas for the expansion of Delamont Park in 2023. This planning process will consider several complex factors including heritage conservation. The overall objective will be to ensure that amenities and design of the park meets the needs of under served residents in the area and follow guidance provided by VanPlay. The solar access protections under the policies in the draft plan would apply to Delamont Park as it exists today. 

    Best,

    Andrew

Page last updated: 29 Jul 2022, 03:03 PM