Kitsilano Beach Park Seaside Greenway Improvements

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Yew Street path in Kitsilano Beach Park is a shared walking, rolling, and cycling path

The survey for the second round of engagement on this project (open from Nov 1-28) is now closed. We heard input from over 700 people on how well different cycle path route options reflect the values of greenspace, connections, directness, parking, and impact, and what they like and dislike about the different options. Thank you for your participation! The survey results will be used to help identify a preferred route for the cycling path.

In August 2021, we conducted a first round of engagement and heard from over 1,220 survey respondents that after safety and comfort, the most important values in choosing a route for the separated cycling pathway are greenspace, connections, and directness, followed by impact and parking.

You can read a summary of the first round of engagement results by clicking here and a detailed report by clicking here.

Learn more about the project and engagement process below. The third and final round of engagement is planned for early 2022.


The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation acknowledges, with respect, that our parks are located on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples.

Translations

The automatic translation tool* is available for: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文] Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語] and Spanish [Español] – please see the tool at the top-right of this page.

*Note: the translation service on our website is hosted by Google Translate. As this is a third-party service, we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of any translated content.

The survey for the second round of engagement on this project (open from Nov 1-28) is now closed. We heard input from over 700 people on how well different cycle path route options reflect the values of greenspace, connections, directness, parking, and impact, and what they like and dislike about the different options. Thank you for your participation! The survey results will be used to help identify a preferred route for the cycling path.

In August 2021, we conducted a first round of engagement and heard from over 1,220 survey respondents that after safety and comfort, the most important values in choosing a route for the separated cycling pathway are greenspace, connections, and directness, followed by impact and parking.

You can read a summary of the first round of engagement results by clicking here and a detailed report by clicking here.

Learn more about the project and engagement process below. The third and final round of engagement is planned for early 2022.


The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation acknowledges, with respect, that our parks are located on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples.

Translations

The automatic translation tool* is available for: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文] Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語] and Spanish [Español] – please see the tool at the top-right of this page.

*Note: the translation service on our website is hosted by Google Translate. As this is a third-party service, we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of any translated content.

Do you have any questions?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have about the Kitsilano Beach Park Seaside Greenway Improvements project. 

Please send us a question and we will get back to you within 5 business days. If we think others may be interested in your question, we will post it here along with our response. Your email and personal information will remain private - only your question and username will be shared.

If you would like to share feedback anonymously, submit your comment here.

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What is this nonsense about users who ‘roll’? I use the park daily, sometimes multiple times, and it’s a rare person who uses it for ‘rolling’ You fail to mention those who use the path for running, why? Are you people sedentary or ‘rollers’ perhaps? You should have rumners up there on every list of users. I’m voting nonconfidence in this process. If you have landscape architects there who are bored bringing coffee to everyone else let them redesign the toilets, they like like they have been there since the 30s, the 1830s

    whatever asked 2 months ago

    Our intention in using “walking and rolling” is to be inclusive of people who walk and who use wheelchairs or other assistive devices. You are right that we have not specified running as one of the many uses of the pathways and park in our website text. We are asking people who fill out the survey how they use the park, and running, using the pool, participating in recreational activities in the park, and participating in water sports are among the options. Thank you for your feedback regarding the toilets. It sounds like you are referring to the washrooms at the fieldhouse at the northeast corner of the park. There are newer and accessible washroom facilities in Kitsilano Beach Park at the concession, in the same building as the Boathouse Restaurant, north of the tennis courts.

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    Your Preliminary Cycle Path Options Evaluation rates each value from 1-5, whereas your survey rates each value from 1-4, with a fifth rating of Not Sure. I believe it would be less of an IQ test if you had kept the rating system consistent. Also, in your Preliminary Options Evaluation, you included "Neighbours" for those being impacted, but not in your online survey. Why? Your 1-way option for a portion of Arbutus year-round has very disruptive effects on the community, including pushing traffic into the core of the neighbourhood.

    UoS asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for this feedback. You are right that we are using one scale in the survey and it is different from the scale we used for a preliminary evaluation of the options. We are sorry for any confusion that this has caused.

    Staff did the preliminary evaluation as an exercise to test one way that we might use the values to evaluate the different design options. We created our own rating system for each value and wanted to share it for the sake of transparency and to demonstrate our thinking at this stage of the process. Our intent was to be open about the factors we are considering when it comes to each of the cycle path options.

    Rather than asking people to adopt a detailed rating system that staff developed, we wanted to ask people how well they think the options reflect each value based on their own assessment of the options and understanding of the values. For this reason, we have not asked people to look at the preliminary evaluation before filling out the survey.

    Thank you for sharing your concerns about the impact of the traffic changes on Arbutus. Impact on neighbours was included in the preliminary evaluation done by staff because we know that some of the options have more of an impact on the neighbourhood than others. We are not asking about impact to neighbours in the public survey because there are many people who use the park who do not live in the immediate vicinity of the park. Instead, we invite and are receiving feedback directly from residents who are very familiar with and well-positioned to speak to potential impacts on the neighbourhood.

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    The multiple choice sections in survey questions are way to extensive and miss the point - the question shouldn't be whether I think an option takes away parking space or whether I think it is the most direct route, but rather whether I am ok with this option taking away parking space or whether I am ok with the route as it is proposed in the option, for instance. Forcing users to answer all of these multiple choice questions (even if they don't help me to express my opinion) or not to participate in the survey (the only alternative) unfortunately made me chose the second option. If you're still interested in my opinion regarding my preferred options for round 2: Zone 1: B Zone 2: D Zone 3: G Thank you.

    pep asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for sharing this feedback on the survey and your preference in terms of the different cycle path options. Our first survey in August asked people what their top values were when it comes to a separated cycling path in the path and we are now asking people how well each of the options reflect those values. Understanding which values people identified as most important and how well the options reflect those values will help to determine a preferred route for the cycling path. In the survey, we are inviting people to evaluate how well each option reflects each value (or select “not sure” if that is the case) and to provide feedback or indicate a preferred option through open-ended questions.

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    In options A & B of the Kits Beach bike path proposal why are you placing the pedestrian path on the outside requiring pedestrians to cross a cycle path to enter the park?

    kitsgirl asked 3 months ago

    In Option A, the existing shared walking/cycling path would become a dedicated cycling path, and a new dedicated pedestrian path would be constructed inside the park, to the north of the cycling path. In Option B, the existing shared walking/cycling path would become a dedicated cycling path, and a new pedestrian path would be constructed at the south edge of the park, south of the cycling path. In Option B, this new path at the south edge of the park will also serve as a sidewalk. (There is currently no sidewalk at the south edge of the park/on the north side of Cornwall between Balsam and Yew.) One advantage of adding a sidewalk here is that it would offer better access into the park for people who drive and park vehicles on the north side of Cornwall between Balsam and Vine. Putting a cycling path right at the south edge of the park would make it challenging for people parking on the north side of Cornwall to access their vehicles. If Option B goes forward, we will need to consider how to ensure that people walking and rolling can safely cross the cycling path to get into the park. We have considered an option that put the cycling path outside the park on Cornwall Street, but are not pursuing it at this time (you can learn more about that option here: https://syc.vancouver.ca/projects/kitsilano-beach-park-greenway/round-2-options-not-pursued.pdf). Note that in Option A and B, the existing walking/rolling path inside the park just south of Kits Pool would remain where it is.

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    With respect to Zone 3 options around the south parking lot and tennis courts, you state: - for option E there is a “Safety risk: potential conflicts with delivery vehicles along Boathouse Restaurant service lane.” How many delivery vehicles use the service lane each day? Do you have a safety concern because some delivery trucks either back-in or back-out in contravention of the restaurant’s management agreement? - for option C why don’t you identify a safety risk where cyclists will cross the ingress/egress point to the south parking lot? What peak vehicle volumes did you record entering or leaving the parking lot? What peak bicycle volumes did you record in the protected bike lane in the parking lot?

    UoS asked 3 months ago

    The possibility of conflicts between service vehicles and people cycling in the service lane is a con for option E, and while there are design approaches we can take to reduce this risk, we want to acknowledge that this is a unique consideration for option E. Park staff are aware that trucks are backing into the service lane and we are working on a solution to this with the restaurant owner and our colleagues in Transportation. The pros and cons lists on our information boards are definitely not exhaustive, and you are correct that for option C a ‘con’ would be that the cycle path crosses the parking lot ingress/egress. We collected data this summer on use of the service lane for deliveries, on parking lot use, and on walking, rolling, and cycling around the park. We are working on processing and analysing this data and hope to share our findings later this year. This data will help in the evaluation of the different cycle path route options. [Correction Nov 16/21: cycle path route option that uses service lane is option E, not option C as was previously stated.]

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    I received a letter from the city in English and Chinese. As a Spanish speaker I feel a strong discrimination against Latin people. I thought that was a thing only in the US, but looks like color and Latin people are not so important as Chinese ones for Vancouver city. I'm 100% disappointed.

    G asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for reaching out to share your concern. We recognise that there are many different language speakers in each neighbourhood, and we apologize for making you feel left out. The reason you see English and Traditional Chinese on our postcards is because English and Mandarin were the top most spoken home languages that people reported in the 2016 Census in the neighbourhood area around Kitsilano Beach Park where the postcards were distributed. The Shape Your City project page and survey can be viewed in Spanish using the automatic translation tool located at the top right corner of the page. In future letters, we’ll do our best to let people know about additional languages available.

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    With respect to Zone 4 you will not be advancing a proposal through the grove of trees because it will require an Archaeological Impact Assessment (AIA) that would be time consuming. That wasn’t a limiting consideration in the Park Board’s 2013 proposed bike lane through Kits Beach and Hadden Park. Why now? What has changed? In 2013 the COV drawings in Appendix1a-SeasdeGreenwayAcceptedRoute included a Low Tree Impact Design by raising the Bike Path 0.2 metres. If this design protects tree roots, wouldn’t it also protect yet-to-be-discovered archeological treasures that might be found during an AIA to be completed as part of a future Kitsilano Beach Park Master Plan?

    UoS asked 3 months ago

    The Park Board’s approach to reconciliation and archaeology has changed considerably since 2013, including the hiring of a full time archaeologist in 2016 and a reconciliation planner in 2017. All projects that may cause ground disturbance or impact a known or suspected archaeological site need to be reviewed by the archaeologist. In this case, we’ve been advised that an AIA should be undertaken in the northeast area of the park before there is any ground disturbance. A low tree-impact design where the bike path is raised would avoid direct ground disturbance, but there is still a risk of disturbance through compression of the weight of the path and through the process of construction that we want to avoid until we are able to complete an AIA.

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    Why are you cutting down a couple of large leafy trees? And why is the city planting so many “brolly trees” which does not offer any shade on the streets and lacks character?

    NOW asked 4 months ago

    All the big leaf maples (Acer macrophyllum) in Kits Park have been closely monitored with annual inspections for over 25 years. Every effort to retain these iconic trees have been made over the years including cable and bracing when appropriate and crown reductions to reduce end weight on the branches. In this way we have been able to retain trees that would otherwise be removed.  Nevertheless there comes a time when the risk to the public is too great and removal is the only option. The trees that were removed fall into that category with severe decay in the main stems.

    With respect to which type of trees are planted, the planting coordinator looks at each location to decide the size and species of trees to be planted. Boulevard width, proximity of buildings, existing trees, overhead wires, soil volumes and neighbourhood master plans are all part of the decision process. It sounds like you may be referring to our planting of Ironwood trees (Parrotia persica). We have planted many of these trees because of their attributes including slow growth (less pruning required), drought resistance, insect resistance, and stability in wind events.  They are also beautiful trees in the fall with deep red colours.

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    Are Limited Speed Motorcycles allowed on the Greenway if insured and registered?

    Barry asked 5 months ago

    Limited Speed Motorcycles are not permitted on the Greenway.

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    I live in kitsilano and have seen an increase of cars driving on separated bike lanes, especially on York st near Cypress. While these new bike lanes are being installed, can we look at improving the other bike lanes in the neighborhood by installing plastic poles in between the bike lanes (on the bike yellow line) preventing cars from entering them?

    Hew asked 5 months ago

    Bollards in bike lanes can help deter drivers from using those lanes but they introduce hazards themselves and people on bicycles may collide with them. Engineering installs bollards where the safety benefits from fewer cars outweighs the collision hazard with the bollard itself.

Page last updated: 13 January 2022, 15:48