Kitsilano Beach Park Seaside Greenway Improvements

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Yew Street path in Kitsilano Beach Park is a shared walking, rolling, and cycling path

Share your input on a separated cycling path in Kitsilano Beach Park. Help us improve the Seaside Greenway at Kitsilano Beach Park to make it a comfortable route for all users, including children, families, and people with reduced mobility.

Kitsilano Beach Park is one of Vancouver’s most popular parks, and we want to make it safer and easier for people to travel to and through the park. We are exploring options to introduce a separated cycling path that will connect Balsam Street with Ogden Avenue and include a section within Kitsilano Beach Park.

We want to know what is important to park and pathway users regarding how you access and connect to Kitsilano Beach Park and the Seaside Greenway. Your input will help us to develop design options for a separated cycle path that make it a safe and comfortable route for all users, including children, families, and people with reduced mobility while reducing conflicts between park users.

Round 1 of engagement was open from August 10-30, 2021 and is now closed. Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey to identify values and priorities for a separated cycling path in Kitsilano Beach Park. Your feedback will help us identify different cycle path route options. Please check back this fall for a summary report of what we heard, and for the next round of engagement. You can also email us at kitsgreenway@vancouver.ca or call 3-1-1 with questions or comments.

The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation acknowledges, with respect, that our parks are located on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples.

Translations

The automatic translation tool* is available for: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文] Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語] and Spanish [Español] – please see the tool at the top-right of this page.

*Note: the translation service on our website is hosted by Google Translate. As this is a third-party service, we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of any translated content.

Share your input on a separated cycling path in Kitsilano Beach Park. Help us improve the Seaside Greenway at Kitsilano Beach Park to make it a comfortable route for all users, including children, families, and people with reduced mobility.

Kitsilano Beach Park is one of Vancouver’s most popular parks, and we want to make it safer and easier for people to travel to and through the park. We are exploring options to introduce a separated cycling path that will connect Balsam Street with Ogden Avenue and include a section within Kitsilano Beach Park.

We want to know what is important to park and pathway users regarding how you access and connect to Kitsilano Beach Park and the Seaside Greenway. Your input will help us to develop design options for a separated cycle path that make it a safe and comfortable route for all users, including children, families, and people with reduced mobility while reducing conflicts between park users.

Round 1 of engagement was open from August 10-30, 2021 and is now closed. Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey to identify values and priorities for a separated cycling path in Kitsilano Beach Park. Your feedback will help us identify different cycle path route options. Please check back this fall for a summary report of what we heard, and for the next round of engagement. You can also email us at kitsgreenway@vancouver.ca or call 3-1-1 with questions or comments.

The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation acknowledges, with respect, that our parks are located on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples.

Translations

The automatic translation tool* is available for: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文] Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語] and Spanish [Español] – please see the tool at the top-right of this page.

*Note: the translation service on our website is hosted by Google Translate. As this is a third-party service, we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of any translated content.

Do you have any questions?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have about the Kitsilano Beach Park Seaside Greenway Improvements project. 

Please send us a question and we will get back to you within 5 business days. If we think others may be interested in your question, we will post it here along with our response. Your email and personal information will remain private - only your question and username will be shared.

If you would like to share feedback anonymously, submit your comment here.

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    Are Limited Speed Motorcycles allowed on the Greenway if insured and registered?

    Barry asked about 2 months ago

    Limited Speed Motorcycles are not permitted on the Greenway.

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    I live in kitsilano and have seen an increase of cars driving on separated bike lanes, especially on York st near Cypress. While these new bike lanes are being installed, can we look at improving the other bike lanes in the neighborhood by installing plastic poles in between the bike lanes (on the bike yellow line) preventing cars from entering them?

    Hew asked 2 months ago

    Bollards in bike lanes can help deter drivers from using those lanes but they introduce hazards themselves and people on bicycles may collide with them. Engineering installs bollards where the safety benefits from fewer cars outweighs the collision hazard with the bollard itself.

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    I believe that an overall Traffic Plan for Kits Point is called for, given 3 major projects in the vicinity: Senakw, Molsons, Lululemon. When can we expect this? Looking at bikes is only one element of a much bigger issue.

    Jeremy asked 2 months ago

    Engineering staff have begun exploring this and are awaiting information from the Sen̓áḵw partnership, which we hope will provide better context for changes on that site. Input from the first phase of Parks’ engagement for Kitsilano Beach Park will also be important input into such a study. No time frame is available at this time.

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    Why does the City not enforce the bicycle helmet law?

    Bev asked 2 months ago

    Helmets are a requirement under the BC Motor Vehicle Act, which is enforced in Vancouver by the Vancouver Police Department. Enforcement of helmet wearing is a lower priority given other demands on VPD.

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    Is there a plan to license e-bikes, and is there a category (hp capability?) for a "bike" to be a motorcycle? I have noticed in Kits Beach Park electric bikes that seem to be very powerful, and travelling too fast.

    Bev asked 2 months ago

    People do not require a license to ride an electric bicycle, but a license is required to operate a speed-limited motorcycle. An electric bike (or “motor assisted cycle”) is a two- or three-wheeled cycle with a seat, pedals and an electric motor or motors. Motor assisted cycles cannot have a power output exceeding 500 watts in total, cannot be gas-powered, and cannot exceed speeds of 32 km/h on level ground. ICBC has a helpful table comparing motor assisted cycles and limited speed motorcycles.

    Experience elsewhere suggests that requiring cyclists to be licensed is neither cost-effective nor particularly effective at achieving desired goals. Our preferred approach to encouraging safe and courteous cycling is through education, promotion, and efforts to normalize cycling as an everyday activity. We can also improve safety by creating separate paths for walking/rolling and cycling so that people traveling at different speeds are using different pathways.

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    How does this initiative connect to the "Arbutus Street Temporary Bike Path (North of Cornwall Ave to McNicoll Ave) document from the City of Vancouver, dated August 10, 2021?

    Robert Ford asked 2 months ago

    The Arbutus Street Temporary Bike Path was installed by Engineering as part of their Room To Move initiative. The goal of the temporary path on Arbutus is to improve the safety and accessibility for all road users in one of the most popular sections of the city’s walking/rolling and cycling network. 

    The temporary bike path on Arbutus Street will be in place until the Kitsilano Beach Seaside Greenway Improvement planning process identifies a dedicated route for a protected bike lane in this area. Until then, adjustments to the path will be made as needed based on feedback from the public.

    The Kitsilano Beach Park Seaside Greenway Improvement project is being led by Parks with the goal of creating a separated cycle path that connects Balsam Street and Ogden Avenue across the park. One possibility for the section of the separated cycle path at the east side of Kitsilano Beach Park is on-street on Arbutus. A dedicated route for the path across the park will be identified through three rounds of public engagement, the first of which is taking place in August.

Page last updated: 22 October 2021, 17:16