Creating and renewing non-profit social and co-op housing

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Vancouver is experiencing a severe shortage of housing that’s affordable to low- and moderate- income renters. Over 50,000 renter households in the city pay more than 30% of their income on rent, with little income left over for other cost of living expenses. This means that many are struggling to make ends meet or living in housing that doesn’t meet their needs.

One important source of non-market housing is housing owned and operated by non-profit societies and co-ops. Non-profit housing can accommodate a broad range of housing needs, including those of families, seniors, and singles who cannot afford market rental

Vancouver is experiencing a severe shortage of housing that’s affordable to low- and moderate- income renters. Over 50,000 renter households in the city pay more than 30% of their income on rent, with little income left over for other cost of living expenses. This means that many are struggling to make ends meet or living in housing that doesn’t meet their needs.

One important source of non-market housing is housing owned and operated by non-profit societies and co-ops. Non-profit housing can accommodate a broad range of housing needs, including those of families, seniors, and singles who cannot afford market rental or ownership housing. However, there is a shortage of non-profit housing in Vancouver, and much of the existing non-profit housing in the city is aging and may be in need of renewal in coming years.

We're working on changes to streamline the development process for new non-profit housing in zoning districts covering select low-rise apartment areas across the city - RM-3A, RM-4, and RM-4N.

These areas consist of three storey condominium and rental apartment buildings. The proposed zoning amendments would allow non-profit social and co-op housing up to six storeys. This approach would be consistent with existing City policies and community plans, which prioritize the delivery of social and co-op housing for low and moderate income households.

Map of RM-3A, RM-4, and RM-4N zoning districts, outlined in purple and yellow

These changes are intended to help existing non-profit societies and co-ops renew existing buildings and build more housing over time, to ensure the city has enough safe and secure non-market homes today and into the future.

Do you have questions for us about this policy proposal? You can submit a question here - we will make every effort to respond within 2-3 business days. The question period will be open through December 14th. 

Submit your questions here

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Following up on the question about 6 story social housing having Comercial on the ground street level. There are a couple of examples of what i think is socail housing on west broadway and the block is "dead" because there is no connection with the street. I've attended your open house lecture on both Happy Cities and The Walkable City and a ket takeawy for me from the twoectures was how critical it is to have socail interation on the street level. Big blank no access store fronts are the kiss of death for a commercial streetscape. My point is not so much about 4 or 5 or 6 or 8ight stories high but it seems to me the critical issue is a vibrant commercial or social interation at the street level.

    daviddclarke asked about 2 months ago

    Hi David - Thank you for the question. The current proposal for 6 storeys/2.5 FSR for 100% social housing without a rezoning is being proposed for the RM-4 and RM-3A zoning areas (map here). These areas are currently designated for residential use, so commercial use at the ground floor would not be permitted. 

    We appreciate your broader concern about the role of street level retail in creating vibrant, walkable communities. We are interested in pursuing how to integrate a street level retail component more broadly in communities across Vancouver through the Broadway Plan and Vancouver Plan.  

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I would like to get more involved in being part of creative thinking and making my neigborhood better. I'm a strong support of change for the better. I'm a home owner of a single family Heritage C listed home in Kits. What I find challenging dealing with the city is that I don't seem to see an "overlay" of all the various factors at play that you are asking us for our involvement. As one example. On this social housing proposal I don't see any of the heritage A,B or C buildings identified. When I look at the map you have icluded here specifing social housing 6 stories, how does this overlay with a proposal we have heard wher all transit routes in Kits will be rezoned to have apartments ? I some cases we have heard this goes on all artterial routes and 150 meters from a park ??? so with getting overly dramatic here in this short comment box...I am left confused because we don't seem to being shown an overall plan for Kitsilano....my neighborhood for the past 20 years ..

    daviddclarke asked about 2 months ago

    Hi David - Thanks for the question. You can see a map of the zoning areas where the proposed changes to allow six storey social housing would apply here.  An updated map for the areas eligible for the separate policy you are referring to, the Secured Rental Policy for Low-Density Transition Areas, is available here. You can also read more about the Secured Rental Policy on a separate Shape Your City page, here

    You may also be interested in learning about current comprehensive planning initiatives underway - the Vancouver Plan and the Broadway Plan


  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Will the 6 story construction be the maximum height of the building? Lots of housing also include a floor of commercial space which is double height of the residential floors or some of the lot space is converted to for profit high-rises to offset costs.

    Larry Laws asked 5 months ago

    Thanks for the question and feedback. 6 storey construction is the maximum height proposed for this initiative. Currently, the zoning in these areas does not allow commercial uses, though this is something that could be explored through future planning work like the Vancouver Plan.