Creating and renewing non-profit social and co-op housing

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Vancouver is experiencing a severe shortage of housing that’s affordable to low- and moderate- income renters. Over 50,000 renter households in the city pay more than 30% of their income on rent, with little income left over for other cost of living expenses. This means that many are struggling to make ends meet or living in housing that doesn’t meet their needs.

One important source of non-market housing is housing owned and operated by non-profit societies and co-ops. Non-profit housing can accommodate a broad range of housing needs, including those of families, seniors, and singles who cannot afford market rental

Vancouver is experiencing a severe shortage of housing that’s affordable to low- and moderate- income renters. Over 50,000 renter households in the city pay more than 30% of their income on rent, with little income left over for other cost of living expenses. This means that many are struggling to make ends meet or living in housing that doesn’t meet their needs.

One important source of non-market housing is housing owned and operated by non-profit societies and co-ops. Non-profit housing can accommodate a broad range of housing needs, including those of families, seniors, and singles who cannot afford market rental or ownership housing. However, there is a shortage of non-profit housing in Vancouver, and much of the existing non-profit housing in the city is aging and may be in need of renewal in coming years.

We're working on changes to streamline the development process for new non-profit housing in zoning districts covering select low-rise apartment areas across the city - RM-3A, RM-4, and RM-4N.

These areas consist of three storey condominium and rental apartment buildings. The proposed zoning amendments would allow non-profit social and co-op housing up to six storeys. This approach would be consistent with existing City policies and community plans, which prioritize the delivery of social and co-op housing for low and moderate income households.

Map of RM-3A, RM-4, and RM-4N zoning districts, outlined in purple and yellow

These changes are intended to help existing non-profit societies and co-ops renew existing buildings and build more housing over time, to ensure the city has enough safe and secure non-market homes today and into the future.

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Where zoning changes would apply

12 days