4949-5255 Heather St and 657 W 37th Ave (Heather Lands) rezoning application

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We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 4949-5255 Heather St and 657 W 37th Ave (Heather Lands). The proposal is to rezone the site from CD-1 (80) and CD-1 (52A) to a new CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. The proposal is for a master-planned redevelopment of the 21-acre site with buildings between 3 and 28 storeys, a childcare facility, a school, a park and public open space, office space, retail space, and a cultural centre. This proposal includes:

  • 144,874 sq. m (1,559,407 sq. ft.) of market residential housing, equal to approximately 1,672 units
  • 35,856 sq. m (385,952 sq. ft.) of secured market rental housing, at least 25% of which is Moderate Income Rental housing. This is equal to approximately 400 units, including 100 moderate income rental units
  • 41,850 sq. m (450,467 sq. ft.) of social housing, equal to approximately 540 units
  • A maximum building height of 92.5 m (304 ft.)
  • 5,787 sq. m (62,287 sq. ft.) of retail space
  • 5,851 sq. m. (62,994 sq. ft.) of office space
  • A 2,095 sq. m (22,549 sq. ft.) Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh (MST) Cultural Centre
  • A 74-space childcare facility
  • A new Conseil Scolaire Francophone (CSF) French elementary school
  • Four acres of park and open space

The application is being considered under the Heather Lands Policy Statement.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.



Heather Lands Flythrough Jan 2021 from Canada Lands on Vimeo.


We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 4949-5255 Heather St and 657 W 37th Ave (Heather Lands). The proposal is to rezone the site from CD-1 (80) and CD-1 (52A) to a new CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. The proposal is for a master-planned redevelopment of the 21-acre site with buildings between 3 and 28 storeys, a childcare facility, a school, a park and public open space, office space, retail space, and a cultural centre. This proposal includes:

  • 144,874 sq. m (1,559,407 sq. ft.) of market residential housing, equal to approximately 1,672 units
  • 35,856 sq. m (385,952 sq. ft.) of secured market rental housing, at least 25% of which is Moderate Income Rental housing. This is equal to approximately 400 units, including 100 moderate income rental units
  • 41,850 sq. m (450,467 sq. ft.) of social housing, equal to approximately 540 units
  • A maximum building height of 92.5 m (304 ft.)
  • 5,787 sq. m (62,287 sq. ft.) of retail space
  • 5,851 sq. m. (62,994 sq. ft.) of office space
  • A 2,095 sq. m (22,549 sq. ft.) Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh (MST) Cultural Centre
  • A 74-space childcare facility
  • A new Conseil Scolaire Francophone (CSF) French elementary school
  • Four acres of park and open space

The application is being considered under the Heather Lands Policy Statement.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.



Heather Lands Flythrough Jan 2021 from Canada Lands on Vimeo.

The virtual open house has concluded. Please use the “Send your comments” tab or contact the Planner directly for any further feedback. Thank you for participating.

Q&A is available from January 11, 2021 to January 31, 2021.

Q&A replaces in-person open houses, which are on hold due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

We post all questions as-is and reply here within two business days. To find out when we reply to your questions, sign in or register.

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    I am concerned about how the Heather Lands scheme impacts accessibility for seniors and people with disabilities. I live on a building on cambie street and it seems like the city is making their best efforts to make building accessibility virtually impossible. There is no parking in front of our building thanks to forcing underused bike lanes through cambie street (when there are plenty of other underused bike one block west on Willow!!) and then the city doubles down by limiting parking for new buildings (we have no guest parking). This makes accessing these building incredibly difficult. My building has quite a high number of seniors as residents and it’s almost discriminatory to impose such accessibility issues on them, their friends, or other residents with elderly family members. At somepoint the city needs to realize the biking is not an option for most people! My understanding is that 35th Avenue will serve as the access road to Heather land – I encourage someone on the planning team actually go have a look at 35th avenue coming off of cambie. The road is barely two cars wide and I suspect it will end up being a massive bottleneck in and out of Heather Lands. Why not maintain the access on 37th and 33rd? Has there been any traffic modelling complete to support the proposed plans (and something that doesn’t just assume half the population will be on bikes by 2027?). Removing the minimal temporary parking on 35th will also make mail access for Canada Post and other couriers very difficult, which I was happy to see someone further down the page already mentioned. I was sad to see that whoever responds to these questions couldn’t take the time to properly answer the residents concerns, and instead opted to just copy-paste city codes – classic lack of vision Vancouver.

    Tim asked 4 months ago

    The City’s current transportation target is to have two-third of the trips  made by walking, cycling or taking transit by 2030. As part of the Heather Lands rezoning submission, the applicant is required to provide transportation demand management measures to support the target and mitigate the traffic impact of the development to the neighbourhood. 

    35th Avenue, along with the existing 33rd Avenue and 37th Avenue, is intended as one access point to the Heather Lands development. The City is currently reviewing the rezoning application, including the draft Transportation Assessment and Management Study. Potential impacts, mitigations, and trade-offs are being explored and evaluated by staff. The outcomes of this review, along with public feedback and other relevant City policies, will be reflected as part of the rezoning report at the time it goes to Council for a decision.  

    All of the proposed buildings on the Heather Lands site are required to provide pick-up/drop-off and loading spaces in accordance with the City’s Parking By-law requirements.Limited on-street parking is currently planned for sections of 35th Avenue within the Heather Lands site. These spaces would serve as a supplement to the off-street parking requirements for the Heather Lands as well as serving the broader neighbourhood.  

    As 33rd Avenue and 37th Avenue are important streets connecting Willow Street and Cambie Street, direct driveway access onto 33rd Avenue and 37th Avenue will be restricted to minimize the number of conflict points between pedestrians, bicycles, and vehicle traffic. The goal is to enhance the walking, cycling, and traffic safety of the neighbourhood.

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    How are the rental fees determined for the different types of rental housing ie. social housing, Moderate income housing , secured market rental and market rental housing? Will there be apartment, office and retail space for sale? Where and when the sales or pre-sales be notify to public? The development will be built in stages, when and approximate at what stage the Culture Center be built? Is there an entrance fees to go in the Culture center after it is built? The heritage building, Fairmount building which is located close to W 33rd and Willow will be saved ( not demolished) and be part of the Culture Center or will it become a public library? Is the childcare facility totally run and fund by government or is it a privately run child care? Will residents who live in the neighborhood get a schedule of approximate what stages the buildings in the development will be started or the City already has an approximate time schedule? There should be an open house in an open area with social distancing ( in Heather Lands parking lot) for neighbors to talk to City staff , when will this be ?

    Farn asked 4 months ago

    Rental rates for a portion of the social housing is based on household incomes as defined by BC Housing’s Housing Income Limits (HILs), which are set annually. For these units, the expectation is that they would be operated on a rent-geared-to-income basis. The remaining units would target moderate-income households. The City will work with the MST Nations to seek additional opportunities, including funding from senior levels of government, to achieve deeper levels of affordability

    Moderate income rental units have starting rents which are set to be affordable to households making between $40,000 to $80,000 per year. In this case, the affordability is tied to the units and not to individual tenancies, so the affordability is protected over time. Rents on the market rental units would be set by the landowners at the time that those units are completed. Marketing, pre-sales, and sales of any market strata units on the Heather Lands site would be undertaken by the landowners at a future stage. 

    The MST Cultural Centre is anticipated to be built in Phase 4 of the Heather Lands proposal. Additional details in terms of programming, architecture, and any associated costs for events or activities would be finalized at that point in time. The Fairmont building is not proposed to remain on the Heather Lands site. The Heather Lands Policy Statement responds to a request from the landowners, the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh (MST Nations) for removal of the building which represents a reminder of negative history and is viewed as a continued imposition of colonial values. This was supported by Council when they approved the Heather Lands Policy Statement in 2018. City staff have been directed to explore the feasibility of relocating the Fairmont building off-site and will report back to Council on these relocation efforts as part of the rezoning process. If no suitable receiver site can be found, the building would be demolished.

    The 74-space childcare facility would be built by the applicant. It is anticipated to be owned by the MST Nations, who would select an operator at a future date. The intent of this childcare facility is to help meet the public need for childcare spaces in Vancouver. 

    Future stages of redevelopment on the Heather Lands would also include site signage and notification of surrounding residents to advise of specific buildings moving forward in the process. The timeline for individual buildings is dependent on when applicants come forward with development applications after the rezoning process. 

    Due to the pandemic, we are not in a position to offer in-person open houses. A virtual engagement strategy is in place to ensure the City’s process for public discussion and feedback remains available. This virtual approach allows people to access materials online and engage at different levels at a time and location of their choosing. The Shape Your City platform is being used across the organization as the standard for engagement.

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    Land Use related - The current development is outside of the Municipal Town Center in the Metro Vancouver Regional Growth Strategy and the Translink Strategic plan. Yet the density is substantial. Is a new City policy to disregard the Regional Plans? Is an amendment required to the Regional plans? If not why not? What comments have been received from the regional authourities on these plans? Is the City planning to modify the Oakridge Town Center boundaries? This redevelopment has been underway for about a decade, what is the reason that it was not included as part of the Oakridge Town center as a designated urban center? How does the density of the Oakridge Town center compare with the proposed density of the Heather Lands? With the increase in Density in this area how can you example the removal of recreational facilities such as the Eric Hamber track and field. Amenities - Inspite of the large amount of information I did not find a summary of the amenities that the City will be getting with this development. It appears that there will be a cultural center, a daycare and a nature trail. However from a community perspective there is a need for a new swimming pool, fitness / sports facilities. How will the development be contributing to these types of amenities? Utilities - What service upgrades are required so that the development can proceed? What streets will be affected? How far downstream from the site will the service upgrades be required? Will the developer be paying for all the required water, sewer, drainage and road upgrades required both on and off the site? Transportation - Will the on-site parking requirements set out in the parking bylaw be met by the development. There are currently significant parking challenges in the area and new development should not increase them? From the proposed unit count I estimate that 6500 will be living in this area. How many people on a daily basis from this new development are expected to use transit, bikes, and cars? The transportation study indicates that several major intersections will fail having a level of service of E or F even after upgrades. Why is this being considered? why are further upgrades not being required? What steps will be taken to ensure that bikes going north on Heather and having to cross the newly realigned road will be able to do so in a safe manner? Heritage - What has the City done to date to preserve the on-site heritage building? Is there any point in having heritage designations if the City's significant building are just going to be demolished? When can I expect an answer to the questions in order to provide overall commentary/ response to the development?

    Hugh2021 asked 4 months ago

    Heather Lands is a large-site with limited ownership, like Pearson-Dogwood, Oakridge Centre Mall or the Oakridge Transit Centre (OTC) and was first identified as a potential redevelopment site in the Riley Park South Cambie Community (RPSC) Vision and again as a large site in the Cambie Corridor Plan. The Heather Lands Policy Statement, approved in 2018. No amendment to the Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) is required and the Heather Lands proposal is supportive of the goals and strategies outlined in the RGS. Currently no modification to the Oakridge Municipal Town Centre (MTC) boundaries are being contemplated.

    The approved Oakridge Centre Mall rezoning includes a range of uses and building heights up to 45-storeys. The gross FSR of the site, calculated across the entire site including streets, parks and open spaces, is 3.71 FSR. There is an application to increase the density at Oakridge Centre Mall to 4.10 FSR. The Heather Lands proposes a gross density of 2.75 FSR.  

    The new Eric Hamber school’s design intent is to build a replacement school in place of the track.  The new and existing school will operate simultaneously; the existing school will stay open until the Seismic Mitigation Program is complete within Vancouver, which is anticipated in 2030. Once the existing school is no longer required as a swing site, the intention is to demolish the school and build a playing field.

    The Heather Lands rezoning proposal offers a number of community amenities and benefits: 4+ acres of new parks and open space, a 74-space childcare centre, as well as the MST Cultural Centre, approximately 400 rental units, and approximately 540 social housing units. There will also be a new CSF French school on-site.

    The Cambie Corridor Plan, includes a comprehensive public amenity plan for the area. The plan incorporates amenities planned for several of the large sites within the plan area including Oakridge Centre Mall, the Oakridge Transit Centre (OTC) site, and Heather Lands. The Cambie Corridor Plan also considers wider community recreational needs for community centres, pool facilities and rinks. Oakridge Centre mall will include a new community centre which is currently underway. Council recently approved the OTC rezoning, including a 74-space childcare, new 2-acre park, and additional social and rental housing. 

    The City anticipates that new development pays for the impacts it creates on infrastructure. Upgrades are funded by the landowner and secured through rezoning conditions. Funding may include contributions from future development in the area, secured through Development Cost Levies (DCLs).  The scope and extent of service upgrades, including which streets are involved, are part of the staff review of the rezoning application and included within the conditions of the Council report. That work is presently underway.

    As part of the rezoning process, the applicant is required to provide a Transportation Assessment and Management Study prepared by a third party engineering consultant to evaluate the potential traffic impacts and potential mitigation measures. This is reviewed in detail by the City’s Engineering staff. The study includes a review of today’s existing parking and traffic conditions, as well as a projection of future conditions considering the Heather Lands proposal. Upon review of the transportation study and rezoning application by Engineering staff for impacts to roadway operations and safety, the City may require the development to provide off-site improvements, as appropriate, to mitigate potential impacts. Through the rezoning, project priorities are confirmed and secured such as target mode share, high quality spaces for walking and cycling, and traffic management measures to mitigate the impacts of the development and ensure the project meets the City’s transportation goals.  

    The removal of the Fairmont building, which acted as the Division ‘E’ Headquarters for the RCMP, was requested by the landowners, the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh (MST Nations) with the support of their partner, the Canada Lands Company (CLC). For the MST Nations, the building represents a constant reminder of negative history and is seen as a continued imposition of colonial values. 

    The Heather Lands Policy Statement, approved by City Council in 2018, concluded that the required retention of the Fairmont building on the site is contrary to the spirit and intent of reconciliation. As such, the Fairmont building is proposed to be relocated off-site in an effort led by City-staff, or demolished if no alternative site can be found. This intent is also reflected in the Heather Lands rezoning application. 

    Following approval of the Heather Lands Policy Statement, Council directed staff to explore the feasibility of relocating the Fairmont building off-site including identification of a receiver site, Relocation of the building would retain and secure protection of the building, and meet Council’s requirements for applications involving a Class A heritage-registered building. Staff will report back to Council on relocation efforts as part of the rezoning process.


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    I understand that you cannot plan an in person Public Open House due to Covid-19. This is a designated as a Large Site, with quite a lot of information to digest. If you want people to participate in a meaningful way in the consultation process you need to communicate the information in different ways. Not every person learns through reading or has the time, some learn through hearing. My question is: We have the technology. Why are you not having a virtual zoom open house with the staff members present so that the public can directly ask questions and everyone can hear the answers?

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    The intent of the Virtual Open House format is to allow people to participate as and when they are able. This is supported by providing application and policy materials on the project website, as well as ensuring a three-week window of time to ask questions publicly. This gives people the flexibility to review, ask questions and comment on a timeframe that works best for them, instead of requiring attendance for a limited period of time on a given date. The project website also means the questions posed by members of the public are both shown and answered publicly by staff in a place where a member of the public can access them at any time. In addition to the Virtual Open House, interested community members can also reach out to staff by phone or email if either format is more helpful for them to understand the project, ask questions, or to comment. Staff will continue to monitor and adapt our online engagement approach to suit various project needs.

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    When the CCP came out it identified the Queen Elizabeth Neighbourhood as needing locally serving retail shops. These shops were to be located around the Cambie and W33rd Intersection and the proposed 33rd Ave Station. Without the publics knowledge the city decided not to do this. When asked why I was told that the city “did not want to dilute the commercial shopping areas of Oakridge and Cambie Village (a bogus reason). It was then decided that it would be incorporated into the Heather Lands redevelopment. My questions are: 1) Was the developer aware of the city's actions in delaying the construction of these much needed amenities? 2) Why are the locally serving retail shops and offices planned for phase 5? This means construction would not start for at least 10 – 20 years if at all? 3) Why and how does the city believe it is acceptable to wait 20 to 30 years for much needed amenities when ‘planning 101’ states that if you increase density you must improve transportation and increase amenities at the same time?

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    The Heather Lands applicant team is aware and informed about various City policies, guidelines and regulations as they relate to the Heather Lands site. This includes both the Cambie Corridor Plan and the Heather Lands Policy Statement, and the planning for commercial space and public amenities.

    The application proposes the buildout over five phases, starting at the southern end of the site. The retail and office floorspace is proposed in Phase 5. The application also includes significant other benefits, such as social and rental housing, including moderate income rental housing, as well as new park and open space, MST cultural centre and a CSF Francophone school.  Adjustments in the proposed phasing plan may be considered as part of the rezoning process.

    Public benefits are anticipated to be delivered throughout each phase of the development. This recognizes the need for amenities like social and rental housing, parks and open space, childcare, cultural amenities and commercial space while balancing the market requirements of applicants who provide these amenities through rezoning. The estimated buildout time of the Heather Lands site is 15 years.

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    I am concerned about the quality and content of the answers that we are receiving. For example Grace Chau asked about the proposed Skytrain Station at W33rd Ave. I live at the corner of Cambie and W33rd Ave so I have taken a keen interest in the proposed Station. For 10 years I have asked various planners about the station. I was told over the years: 1) The Station was only proposed because they were uncertain of ridership numbers on the line, but once those numbers were known a station would be built 2) I was told by Councillor Reimer very early on in the process that the station would never be built (no money in Translink's budget for it and that the money would have to come from private funds like a developer). When I asked about the station at open houses during the consultation process, I was stonewalled and only told was that it was proposed. Now ten years later for the first time I learn that there are no plans to built the station. Many people in the area bought condo's partly because they believed a station would be built. It was even mentioned in one of the condo's sales brochures, "located steps away from the 33rd Ave Station". This is a classic bait and switch scenario. Say that there is going to be a station, get extra density for being close to it . Never build the station but receive the density for it. Re: Bus route on W33rd Ave. The Transportation Study states," While a new bus route is planned on 33rd Ave frontage...". So my questions are: 1) Why is density being allowed to remain when no station is being built? 2) Why does the transportation study state that a new bus route is planned and you contradict it? 3) Why are we only getting this information now, not 10 years ago? 4) Why haven't staff already evaluated the transportation impacts (isn't it like putting the cart before the horse) as this directly affect residents in the area. Again I would like to see transparent, complete and truthful answers. I would like to see a decrease in allowed density because there is no station.

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    The proposed density for the rezoning application is based on the Heather Lands Policy Statement and a 2019 Issues Report. The Heather Lands Policy Statement establishes density based on multiple City objectives including sustainability, affordability and livability. The density set out in the Policy Statement was not predicated on a Canada Line station at 33rd Avenue, which is not currently included in TransLink’s 10-year investment plan.

    The transportation study refers to a future potential new bus route  along 33rd Avenue as opportunity identified in the Cambie Corridor Plan. At present, there are no plans underway to create this new bus service; however this may change in the future with development like the Heather Lands.

    Planning for the Heather Lands was initiated in July 2016. Throughout the planning process, the 33rd Avenue station was identified as a future potential opportunity that is not yet funded. The Mayors’ Plan (released in 2014) identifies other priorities for transit investment in Vancouver over the next 10-12 years and does not include a new station at this location.  Specific investments identified in the Mayors’ Plan for the Canada Line are more train cars and upgrades to existing stations.     

    As part of the Heather Lands Policy Statement, a preliminary transportation assessment was competed to understand the potential impacts of the proposed development on the local transportation network. As part of the rezoning process, the applicant is required to provide a Transportation Assessment and Management Study prepared by a third party engineering consultant to evaluate the potential traffic impacts and potential mitigation measures, which is reviewed in detail by the City’s Engineering staff. The study includes a review of today’s existing parking and traffic conditions, as well as a projection of future conditions with the addition of the proposed changes on the development site. Upon review of the transportation study and rezoning application by Engineering staff for impacts to roadway operations and safety, the City may require the development to provide off-site improvements, as appropriate, to mitigate potential impacts. 

    Through the rezoning, project priorities get confirmed and secured such as target mode share, high quality spaces for walking and cycling, and traffic management measures to mitigate the impacts of the development and ensure the project meets the City’s transportation goals.  

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    Why has the city not commissioned a 3rd party Comprehensive Transportation Study in the area of and bordered by 45th Ave, Oak St, W33rd Ave and Cambie St? The Heather Land rezoning development is located within this area and the community has been asking for the last 10 years for a Comprehensive Transportation study. The Site Specific Transportation Study commissioned by the developer should not take the place of a Comprehensive Traffic Study because it does not show the cumulative affect that all rezoning’s in the area would have on the existing transportation network in the area. It also does not adequately address the concerns of the public when it comes to congestion and lack of parking or meaningful strategies to mitigate them. We also need information re: The Oakridge Canada Line Station operating at overcapacity when all of the new developments in the area are built out (Oakridge Centre, Municipal Town Centre, Heather Lands, Bus Barns, and MTC lands, and CCP 3).

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    For major projects such as the Heather Lands and Oakridge Centre, the City requires a transportation study for both policy work and the rezoning stage. Those studies take into consideration all related approved policies (i.e. they are cumulative).  Through major projects like the Heather Lands, transportation studies allow the City to understand the impact that the proposal has on the surrounding neighbourhoods and consider transportation strategies that focus on enabling access and accessibility in line with the Climate Emergency Action Plan. These studies take into consideration all related approved policies and projects in the surrounding area. Industry best practice and experience has shown that site-generated traffic impacts diminish rapidly farther away from the development. In the context of the changing transportation habits seen in Vancouver, these more neighbourhood focused assessments often provide greater value than traditional broad transportation studies.

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    I am concerned about the quality of the answers that we are getting. Derrick was concerned about parking in the area. It has been a perennial problem for years. Your answer only addresses new buildings and you do not give any answers re: where people will be able to park. I live on the corner of Cambie and W33rd Ave in one of three townhouses there is no visitor parking associated with it. It is very difficult for delivery trucks and Canada post to make deliveries in this area. For the most part delivery trucks just pull over and put their flashers on or park in the laneway blocking access to the lane. This is a real concern especially in light of Transportation 2040 a plan where parking is going to be decreased. A major paradigm shift with no transition period. A transition period should have occurred in conjunction with an educational advertisement campaign in CCP 2 but developers in this area were resistant because they believed that they would not be able to sell their units without parking. Now in CCP 3 this seems to be only occurring in new rental buildings. This is discriminatory in nature as people are choosing to rent due to the high cost of housing not because they cannot afford to buy a car! People will drive their elementary aged children to school because there are no schools in walking distance and drive their children to after school activities. They will also use their cars to go grocery shopping. It is going to take time to make the shift from vehicular transportation to other forms such as mass transit, walking etc. Many neighbour's concerns are what will happen in the interim? My questions are: 1) Where are people going to park in the neighbourhood? 2) If people do not have parking in the Heather Lands will they park in the surrounding neighbourhoods?

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    Heather Lands will be designed to meet the Climate Emergency Action Plan goals, including seeking to reduce reliance on the private automobile by increasing trips by active modes. The Parking By-Law sets out requirements for parking and loading that are to be provided on-site for new development properties. The Heather Lands are expected to build the appropriate amount of parking and loading to service their building without relying on-street parking, so residents and visitors should be able to park in their building. 

    New developments here will also be required to provide Transportation Demand Management measures that make it easier to choose sustainable modes such as walk, bike, and transit. If people are looking for additional parking options they may choose to park on-street in the neighbourhood. Street parking will continue to be available in the neighbourhood as a public amenity.

    Staff are currently exploring a citywide residential parking program, as directed by Council in November 2020 as part of the Climate Emergency Action Plan. The program would help reduce pollution while addressing current and future parking issues in a growing city. Take this survey to help us understand what parking is like in your neighbourhood today. Your input will help us develop a program that works for everyone. The survey will take about 10 minutes to complete and is open until February 28. The survey can be found here: https://shapeyourcity.ca/parking 

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    “The City of Vancouver classifies a “Large Site” as a site that has more than 8,000 m2 in land area and given that the Heather Lands site is 8.5 hectares (85,000 m2) and it meets this threshold. Any site classified as a Large site is required to provide a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plan, which provides at least 30 points worth of measures. The City has advised that a TDM Plan is not required until the Development Permit stage.” Page 8 Transportation Study My question is: Why has the city deemed a Transportation Demand Management Plan not required until the Development Permit stage when it contains information about both Car Share Vehicles and their Parking Spaces and Bicycle Parking which could impact the surrounding neighbourhood?

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    An acceptable Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plan is required at rezoning for Heather Lands, including a legal agreement committing to deliver this TDM Plan. The precise allocation of measures is finalized at the Development Permit stage because several TDM measures rely on building design details that are not available at the Rezoning stage. At the rezoning stage, applicants typically provide a draft TDM Plan that the City reviews and provides comments on, to be incorporated into the final TDM Plan at the Development Permit stage.

     More information about Transportation Demand Management can be found here:

     https://vancouver.ca/your-government/parking-bylaw.aspx

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    In several places the Transportation Study states that both the intersections of W 33rd Avenue & Oak Street and W 33rd Avenue & Cambie Street were shown to exceed performance thresholds. To accommodate the additional development volume would require major geometric improvements and street widening, which has not been planned for the area. My questions are: 1) Does over capacity at intersections result in traffic congestion, increased noise and pollution? 2) Why is the city allowing this density when the existing and future transportation network cannot support this development volume of density especially when no mitigation strategies have been suggested? 3) Why is the city so inflexible and adamant that they will not mitigate traffic congestion by enlarging intersections but then offer no other alternatives?

    Monique Choptuik asked 4 months ago

    Busy but functional intersections in an urban environment often operate near or over capacity from a purely technical perspective. When assessing the potential need for upgrades and changes, staff balance the environmental impacts of creating additional capacity for vehicles, which may be beneficial for only a short period each day during peak times, and improvements that support affordable, low carbon, sustainable, and healthy transportation mode choices such as walking, cycling, and transit. Overall, shifting trips to sustainable modes has the desired long term effect of reducing congestion, noise and pollution.

    During development of the Heather Lands Policy Statement, detailed consideration of new streets and connections were established including the extension of 35th Ave, a new retail street, closure of a portion of Heather Street, and connections to existing streets – 33rd  Ave, Manson Street, and Baillie Street. Along with the new streets, some adjustments to the existing off-site street network may be required. This may include enhancement to existing intersections. These adjustments will be determined through the rezoning analysis and secured through conditions.

    Staff carefully consider the impacts that potential intersection changes can have on people driving, as well as people walking, cycling, and taking transit. Larger intersections can have a number of negative impacts on people walking, rolling, and biking, which can work against the City’s Climate Emergency Action Plan goals. For example, wider intersections have longer crosswalks, and the added time and distance can be uncomfortable for many people to cross. Additionally, the extra space needed to enlarge intersections for vehicle traffic makes it challenging to provide generous space for people walking and cycling. To achieve the objectives in the Transportation 2040 and Climate Emergency Action Plan, the City aims to improve the efficiency of existing rights-of-way and encourage more walking, biking, and taking transit by enhancing active transportation design treatments.

    The Heather Lands Policy Statement does include a new 35th Avenue street connection which will provide improved access to Cambie Street. Other opportunities are being assessed as part of the rezoning review.