Broadway Plan Emerging Directions: Area-Wide Policy

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Welcome to the Area-Wide Policy section of the Emerging Directions Virtual Open House

This section introduces Area-Wide policies that apply across the study area. The policy areas include:

  • At Home (Housing)
  • At Work (Jobs and the Economy)
  • Getting Around (Transportation)
  • Places for Public Life
  • One Water
  • Heritage
  • Arts and Culture
  • Community Well-Being
  • Sustainability and Resilience
  • Public Benefits Strategy

To learn about the Area-Wide Policy highlights, visit the Area-Wide Policy StoryMap .

View the detailed Area-Wide Policy Emerging Directions in PDF format.

Complete the survey to provide your feedback.

Welcome to the Area-Wide Policy section of the Emerging Directions Virtual Open House

This section introduces Area-Wide policies that apply across the study area. The policy areas include:

  • At Home (Housing)
  • At Work (Jobs and the Economy)
  • Getting Around (Transportation)
  • Places for Public Life
  • One Water
  • Heritage
  • Arts and Culture
  • Community Well-Being
  • Sustainability and Resilience
  • Public Benefits Strategy

To learn about the Area-Wide Policy highlights, visit the Area-Wide Policy StoryMap .

View the detailed Area-Wide Policy Emerging Directions in PDF format.

Complete the survey to provide your feedback.

Do you have a question about the Area-Wide emerging directions policies?

The Broadway Plan team is happy to answer any questions you may have about the emerging directions for Area-Wide Policy. Please send us a question and we'll get back to you within two business days.

Note: If you have a question about the Broadway Subway, please contact the Province of British Columbia's project team which is responsible for the station design and construction. If you would like more information about the Broadway Subway Project visit broadwaysubway.ca or email broadwaysubway@gov.bc.ca

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    With the Senakw project, how is the city planning to pay for the impact on the neighbouring schools, hospitals, roads, police and fire services if City taxes are not being assessed on the properties.

    Leslie D asked 28 days ago

    Hello Leslie,

    The City is aware of these concerns and recognizes it is important. However, due to ongoing discussions between the city and MST DC we are unable to comment at this time. More details will be available about this in the future.

    Thank you,

    Andrew

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    The idea of fast and conveneient transit is that people from all over the region can travel to along Broadway and also to the Downtown quickly and easily. Since the Subway is making travel from other parts of the City and region easy, why are we still focussing on having more housing located close to the employment centres around VGH and City Hall?

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello Jan,

    Its about providing more housing choice, and convenience while leveraging the investment in the Broadway Subway. Vancouver is in a housing crisis and we've heard through our expansive engagement that current renters are concerned about their ability to stay in the area and people are frustrated over the inability to find affordable and suitable homes. The Broadway Plan will be considering how we plan around the subway to give people the option of living closer to work which will mean shorter commutes. The planning process will also provide us the opportunity to think about how we plan for the housing needs of different populations who are underserved. Including seniors’ accessibility and care needs, workers’ proximity to job opportunities, families need for flexible space, and culturally-appropriate Indigenous housing.


    The Broadway Planning Team

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    Will there be a public washroom / washrooms at the subway stations?

    Debora Nortman asked 3 months ago

    Hello Debora,

    There will be public washrooms available along the Broadway subway. For specific details, I would encourage you to contact the province as they are the government body leading the project and in the best position to answer this question. Their website is https://www.broadwaysubway.ca/contact/connect/ and their phone number is 778-572-3544  

    Best,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    In the At-Home section you say that there is a demand for 'customer fulfilment' centres. Can you please explain what a 'customer fulfilment centre' is? Is this a church or other spiritual centre?

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello,

    You must be referring to the reference in the "At Work" section. Customer fulfillment centres hold inventory for all types of businesses that sell physical products whether through an online store or a traditional brick and mortar retailer.

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    Are you making the questions being asked public? Will the questions and answers be posted on this site?

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello, 

    Yes we are making the questions and answers public. Please browse the Ask A Question tab on the different pages to see what your neighbours have asked as well as our replies.

    Best regards, 

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    Why do you call the RT areas that form a band across the south side of the Plan area "SIngle Family/Duplex" zones. These are zoned RT which promotes multiple conversion dwellings. New duplexes are not a dominant form of development and there are virtually no new single family houses and not many existing ones either. This seems to be an attempt to paint these very dense older neighbourhoods that are full of existing affordable ground oriented rental units as low density.

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello, 

    Thank you for your feedback. We recognize that the RT zoned areas do contain a mix of different ground-oriented housing types, such as multiple conversion dwellings, duplexes, and single-family homes. Typically, these areas are lower density than other areas in the Broadway Plan such as the RM apartment areas, but we also realize that there are many existing secondary rental units in the RT areas. 

     There are data limitations for quantifying the exact number of secondary suites that exist currently; however, we will consider your input for future work and endeavour to provide more context on what exists today in RT zones of the Broadway Plan area.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    If City wants to provide a diverse living options, why market condo were little or not mention throughout the study. It is important for people to have choice to own their home instead of being a renter forever.

    Minnie Li asked 7 months ago

    Hello Minnie, 

    We agree that it is important to have a diversity of housing options given how diverse our population and their housing needs are. The Broadway Plan Emerging Directions propose significant shift of new development opportunities to focus on rental, social, and supportive housing in recognition of the significant need in the communities. Over the past several decades, despite a growing need for rental, social, and supportive housing, the majority of new residential development in Vancouver has been strata condominiums. The most recent census data shows that about 9,800 renters in Broadway are paying over 30% of their income on housing and from the last census we know that 76% of net new households to the city were renters. We also know that the median incomes for renters in Vancouver is ~$50,000/year which puts ownership housing out of reach. 

     However, we also recognize that there is desire for ownership housing in the Broadway Plan area, therefore we are proposing to enable new strata development but in select locations. More details on specific policy proposals will be available in the coming months, so stay tuned for updates and more information.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    Why isn't architecture & character included in the policies?

    daniel_kryz asked 7 months ago

    Hello Daniel,

    The engagement phase that just concluded, Emerging Directions, was focused on high level policy directions for Broadway Plan. It introduced a proposed spatial framework for growth and change in the Broadway neighbourhoods, and policy directions for various topics (e.g. Affordable Housing, Transportation, Arts and Culture, etc.), to take a “temperature check” with the community to ensure we are on the right track with the key moves before getting into more detailed planning. The next phases of the planning program will have more specifics around built form and building typologies, public realm elements, and other features that contribute to neighbourhood character.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    Re heritage policies, you say that you heard people indicating a desire to retain heritage areas but your actual heritage policies have only two items that mention actual heritage buildings. The rest talk about reconciliation and cultural resources. There are only two of the heritage policies that mention actual heritage buildings and nothing that talks about character buildings or character/heritage streetscapes. The first relating to heritage buildings only says that you want to have incentive policies. Are you suggesting that incentives would be available to buildings not actually on the heritage register or would character houses not on the register be available for redevelopment into apartments. The second says that new development that demolishes heritage should contribute to the City's Conservation Fund. In that policy you mention that this would occur in those areas that are identified for change. Are there any areas in the Broadway Plan that are NOT identified as areas for change? This is not an effective heritage policy. I don't see any policy that says the Plan will identify neighbourhoods or streetscapes that have heritage and character merit and seek to adopt policies that will support their retention. Incentives are ineffective if the underlying zoning promotes redevelopment. You have no statement that says you will "Promote and Support" heritage neighbourhoods.

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello, 

    Thanks for your comments and questions about the emerging heritage directions for Broadway Plan. As you note, in line with the Vancouver Heritage Program, Broadway Plan is taking an expansive view of heritage including not only built heritage but also with a focus on cultural/intangible heritage, as well as opportunities to encourage Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh voices and visibility on the land, a significant priority for Vancouver and the Broadway Plan area as a City of Reconciliation. In terms of heritage buildings, more specifics around heritage conservation, incentives, how low density areas can evolve with new rental apartments, potential historic districts, and other considerations will be shared for review and input in the next phases of the planning program. Regarding heritage amenity shares, these are already currently available in the C-3A zoning along Broadway for example. New development can have an additional 10% density/FSR through contribution towards amenity shares, which support the citywide Heritage Conservation Fund. There may be other areas/zones of focused growth where this would be considered. We appreciate your input and encourage you to stay involved in the Broadway planning process.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

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    You give numbers for existing rental units in what you call Single Family/Duplex areas. How did you determine the numbers? You have the number 435 Multiple Conversion Rental Dwellings in all the RT areas in Mount Pleasant both around Fraser St. and around City Hall as well as the areas on both sides of Arbutus St in Kitsilano. I am familiar with these areas and there are many many hundreds if not thousands of rental units in these areas. What study was carried out?

    j pierce asked 8 months ago

    Hello, 

    Thank you for your comment. The City of Vancouver maintains an internal database of the purpose-built rental housing stock for any property containing 3 or more rental units, which may include Multiple Conversion Dwellings, but often does not capture basement or secondary suites. For the purposes of our study, the primary data source we used to estimate the number of Multiple Conversion Rental Dwellings and secondary suites was through B.C. Assessment data from 2019. B.C. Assessment is responsible for maintaining an extensive and up-to-date database on all properties in the province including. The 435 Multiple Conversion Dwellings figure refers to the total number of MCDs in RT areas, however there is limited data on the total number of suites due to difficulties in identifying, enforcing, and legalizing unpermitted suites. We have noted these data limitation in our print and presentation materials.

    Best regards,

    The Broadway Planning Team

Page last updated: 13 May 2021, 09:46