349 E 6th Ave rezoning application

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We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 349 E 6th Ave. The proposal is to allow for the development of a 12-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RM-4 (multiple dwelling) to CD-1 (comprehensive development). The proposal includes:

  • 82 social housing units
  • Floor space ratio (FSR) of 4.87
  • Floor area of 5,462 sq. m (58,791 sq. ft.)
  • Maximum height of 38.7 m (127 ft.)
  • 20 vehicle parking spaces and 106 bicycle parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Mount Pleasant Community Plan.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.


We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 349 E 6th Ave. The proposal is to allow for the development of a 12-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RM-4 (multiple dwelling) to CD-1 (comprehensive development). The proposal includes:

  • 82 social housing units
  • Floor space ratio (FSR) of 4.87
  • Floor area of 5,462 sq. m (58,791 sq. ft.)
  • Maximum height of 38.7 m (127 ft.)
  • 20 vehicle parking spaces and 106 bicycle parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Mount Pleasant Community Plan.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.

The virtual open house has concluded. Please use the “Send your comments” tab or contact the Planner directly for any further feedback. Thank you for participating.
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    Since the adoption of the Mount Pleasant Community Plan over 2000 units of housing have been built within a 6 block radius of Main & Broadway. How many of those are subsidized, rental units or classified as affordable at the time of rezoning approval /development application?

    neighbour asked 2 months ago

    The 6 block radius from Main and Broadway has had 2,682 residential unit completions since the year 2000 (accounting for both conversion and new construction buildings). Of those 2,682 units, 90 were considered non-market units, 349 were secured market rental units, and 172 were unsecured rental units with no formal housing agreements/covenants with the City of Vancouver.

    The geographic boundaries for this analysis were South: 15th, North: 2nd Avenue, East: Carolina Street, West: Yukon Street.

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    Statement in an answer below: >> There will be 57 units that are available for below market rents ... and a total 82 units of affordable rental housing<<. So 25 units at market rents, correct? (The words “market rents” is considerably more meaningful in Vancouver planning speak than the word “affordable”) [NEW PARAGRAPH*] Where will these 25 units be located ? [NEW PARAGRAPH*] (The top three floors of the building will command a roughly 20% higher market rent than the 2nd thru 5th floors ... views command a significant dollar premium in the Vancouver real estate market.) [NEW PARAGRAPH*] Will the market rent units be guaranteed an assigned parking spot? [NEW PARAGRAPH*] Re my [NEW PARAGRAPH*] interjections above: My submission of a few days ago reads poorly because my paragraphs and purposeful blank spaces disappeared so some of the context of questions I was asking became unclear. Only City representatives are allowed to compose separate paragraphs and use blank spaces in this City designed web open house ... I suspect that if the City’s representatives had their writings garbled and made less readable on a City web site, that web site would be revamped very quickly. Is this suspicion justified?

    Jon asked 2 months ago

    The current proposal involves a rent mix with approximately 70% of units falling within Housing Income Limits rent levels (50% Rent Geared to Income units, and 20% Shelter-rate units), and 30% of units at the lower end of market rent. 

    There would be a total of 20 parking spaces. 1 passenger loading space and 5 accessible parking spaces. Parking will be offered first to the residents moving from 325 east 6th avenue as they will be provide with the right of first refusal. Accessible parking spots will be reserved for people with disabilities or residents with mobility issues. The remaining of parking spots will be based on first come basis.

    Closer to completion, Brightside will allocate the lower end of market units throughout the building and to a mix of units depending on the final project budget.

    Thank you for your comments on our virtual open house method, which we are continuing to monitor and adapt. You are welcome to submit individual questions through multiple question forms. To submit comments using paragraphs, please use the ‘Send your comments’ tab.

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    1. Please explain where 60 additional units' worth of vehicles are going to park on already congested streets and bike lanes. Prioritizing seniors and people on lower incomes (potentially those with disabilities) means that these people and their visitors will require vehicular transport. In an earlier answer you say "Reduced parking demand typically results in reduced vehicle ownership for this type of development as not all residents will own vehicles" - I would really appreciate the source of this information. As far as I am aware, studies of this type are retrospective and based on European populations. Unfortunately, Canadian cities and climates are not optimized for carless transport, especially for the individuals you claim to be prioritizing. 2. Please explain the justification for the extreme height of this building relative to the neighbourhood around it, and rationale behind belief that it will not alter the current look and feel. Of course this will set precedent for future developments. 3. Please explain how adding mostly 1BD and studio units (and very limited parking) supports families accessing housing. 4. Please explain how you are going to improve neighbourhood lighting in general for security- sidewalks are exceptionally dark in the winter, with trees covering the few existing streetlights. 5. Raising my family nearby, I would appreciate knowing exactly how potential increase in crime, with particular focus on drug use. 6. I would like to know how the city of Vancouver plans to continue to invest in the neighbourhood so that existing residents actually benefit.

    Alyssa asked 2 months ago

    The parking requirements of this project is carried out by the City’s Engineering department based on the local transportation demands. Typically, developments for social housing and non-market rental developments generate lower parking demand than typical market rental or market strata. The 2018 Metro Vancouver Regional Parking Study includes data parking on utilization. 

    In terms of the height, the proposed site is being considered for a 12-storey residential building under the Mount Pleasant Community Plan (MPCP). This project is a social housing proposal which, in exchange, allows for extra density and height. Section 4 of the MPCP also includes specific goals for the provision of housing opportunities. You can review the MPCP, which is available online and provides an overview of what is anticipated in the Mount Pleasant area. The City’s Housing Vancouver Strategy also aims to provide for an increased number of affordable housing projects across the City. 

    This site is also located in the Broadway Plan Area Plan which leverages the Broadway subway line investment for rapid transit and new housing opportunities. Some of the goals and guiding principles include but are not limited to expanding housing opportunities across the spectrum to accommodate for rental housing demands, reinvest in older housing stock, and diversify household incomes and backgrounds.

    The housing unit mix of this project is also based on Brightside’s housing portfolio across the city. Brightside provides housing primarily to seniors and those with disabilities. The project is also geared towards and prioritizes seniors, particularly those who reside in Lion’s Manor as they will have the right of first refusal for the new building once it’s complete. 

    In regards to safety, typical rezoning conditions that are included in the rezoning report and are applicable if the development is approved are CPTED strategies which generally include:

    • Having particular regard for mischief in alcoves and vandalism such as graffiti;
    • Consideration of mail theft in the design and location of mailboxes;
    • Consideration of residential break and enter;
    • Provision of outdoor common area and path lighting; and
    • Provisions for visibility and security in the underground parking garage in accordance with the Parking By-law, including:
    • Providing 24 hour overhead lighting at exit doors and step lights;
    • Providing white-painted walls, and;
    • Ensuring a high degree of visibility at doors, lobbied, stairs, and other access routes.


    Additionally, through staff review it will be determined if additional improvements are necessary that will improve local safety such as improved street lighting.  

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    Which unit types have been identified for below market rates? If not each of the 3 bedroom units then why not since these would be occupied by families?

    neighbour asked 2 months ago

    The project proposes to meet the City of Vancouver’s definition of Social Housing as defined in the Zoning and Development By-law:

    • in which at least 30% of the dwelling units are occupied by households with incomes below housing income limits, as set out in the current “Housing Income Limits” table published by the British Columbia Housing Management Commission, or equivalent publication; 
    • which is owned by a non-profit corporation, by a non-profit co-operative association, or by or on behalf of the City, the Province of British Columbia, or Canada; and 
    • in respect of which the registered owner or ground lessee of the freehold or leasehold title to the land on which the housing is situate has granted to the City a section 219 covenant, housing agreement, or other security for the housing commitments required by the City, registered against the freehold or leasehold title, with such priority of registration as the City may require;


    Brightside is proposing a rental mix with approximately 70% of units falling within Housing Income Limits rent levels (50% Rent Geared to Income units, and 20% Shelter-rate units), and 30% of units at the lower end of market rent. As a result, the various rental levels will be distributed across the entire unit mix including family units. 

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    How much did the city charge this non-profit housing applicant to go through the rezoning / development process? Had that not been required, could the rents of these proposed non-market homes have been even lower, or alternatively, could more housing have been included in this proposal?

    Silent_Echo asked 3 months ago

    The rezoning application fee for this project was  based on the 2020 Fee Schedule. A rezoning application is required to review and analyze a proposed development to ensure the development will meet a number of objectives including: City By-laws, policies, neighbourhood context, form of development, engineering requirements and tenant needs etc. This combined with financial considerations generally factor into the number of units being proposed of a particular development. 

    The current proposal involves a rent mix with approximately 70% of units falling within Housing Income Limits rent levels (50% Rent Geared to Income units, and 20% Shelter-rate units), and 30% of units at the lower end of market rent. As a result, the rents in the new development will vary from $375 to $2,370 per month.  Rent structure proposed for this project is based on a funding model that factors in grants and financing from BC Housing’s Community Housing Fund program which is currently being pursued. Brightside is currently exploring financing and grants with the objective of increasing the affordability of rental homes over the building’s lifetime.

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    The City announcement notes this is being considered under the MP Community Plan - specifically which points?

    neighbour asked 2 months ago

    Yes, this project is being considered under the Mount Pleasant Community Plan (MPCP). Section 4 of the MPCP also includes specific goals for the provision of housing opportunities. You can review the MPCP, which is available online and provides an overview of what is anticipated in the Mount Pleasant area. You can also access the city boards which summarizes the MPCP guidelines that are applicable to this project: https://rezoning.vancouver.ca/applications/documents/349-e-6th-ave-city-boards.pdf 

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    How have the existing residents of the Lions Seniors facility been consulted on the project and how many wish to live in a building with families and a varied age range?

    neighbour asked 2 months ago

    Brightside first informed the residents about the intention to redevelop the site on July 10, 2019. Since then, Brightside has been sharing information pertaining to the development process and gathering resident feedback for the new building. Brightside has also ensured senior residents of Lions Manor have access to the virtual open house so their feedback is recorded.

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    Why are all the renderings taken from a birds eye view? This is not a true representation of the mass of the building relative to its surroundings and people on the street.

    neighbour asked 2 months ago

    There are renderings that are taken from the bird’s eye view, but also renderings that are taken from the street level. They can all be reviewed here: https://rezoning.vancouver.ca/applications/349e6thave/documents/Renderings.pdf  

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    If this project doesn't go though because of NIMBYism in Mt. Pleasant, will the City create any public awareness campaigns about the current housing crisis to ensure necessary housing projects are not stopped in the future? Will the fact that low-income housing development is NOT a factor in gentrification (and is, in fact, the opposite) be addressed by the City?

    Sarah asked 3 months ago

    The City is actively addressing the current housing crisis issue through various initiatives such as the Housing Vancouver Strategy, the City’s vision for ensuring that Vancouver can be a home for people of all incomes and backgrounds, by prioritizing affordable housing and making housing markets work for all people who live and work in the City.  As part of the rezoning application process, this project will be voted on by Council at a public hearing. Further, the “Guiding Principles” established for the Broadway Plan Area where this project is located seeks to support affordable, diverse, equitable and inclusive complete neighbourhoods.

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    I would like to know how City Planning justifies a 12 story height at the location ... and if the same justification could be used for a similar social housing building of 14 stories on the optioned site to the west at 330 W. 6th in the future but before I ask the questions some facts that I would like considered: A City answer to a question from lara a few days ago states: > Any future developments will need to follow approved policies, plans, and guidelines such as the Mount Pleasant Community Plan ... < P. 9 of that plan reads in part: >>>‘Hilltown’ identity Conceive of Mount Pleasant as a distinctive ‘hilltown’ area whose centre is a high-attraction zone for both residents and city visitors. Recognize that its slopes are natural form-makers on which a low profile for residential and commercial properties helps keep the sense of hill intact. ... Predominantly low to mid-rise massing Honour the local preference for a ‘high-low massing rhythm’ across the hill town, but with modest height as the norm: mostly low to mid-rise buildings, high rises only on selected sites. <<< Note the last two words above. How did 349 E 6th become a selected site for a much higher building than anything within a few blocks ? Chelsea Tower 330 E 6th is seven stories, Wohlsein at 311 E. 6th is six, 250 E 6th, close to Main and well away from the older residential area is eight stories, but the top story is pulled back and from many close vantage points it reads as seven ... So the proposed building will be roughly 80% taller than any existing building within two blocks ... correct me if I am wrong in this assertion. My questions again: 1a/b) How does City Planning justify a 12 story height at this site given the above // How did 349 E 6th become a selected site for a much higher building than anything within a few blocks ? 2)And would the same justifications argue for approval of a 14 or 12 storey future building on the site directly to the west of 349 E 6th presently occupied by social housing that is currently optioned to Wall ?

    Jon asked 3 months ago

    Social Housing development is supported in the Mount Pleasant Community Plan as highlighted below. As such the applicant has submitted an application to rezone the property at 349.E 6th Ave as permitted under the enabling policy for this project, Section 4.0 of the Plan:

    • Section 4.1 Housing: Provide more housing and more affordable housing in Mount Pleasant for low to middle income households, especially for families, seniors, new immigrants, and aboriginal people.
    • Section 4.1 (ii) Non-market Housing: Support the distribution of non-market housing throughout the community and the City to retain neighbourhood diversity of population and services


    It  should be noted that the current proposal at 349 East 6th Avenue located in the Broadway Planning area.  As such, the Broadway Plan Interim Rezoning Policy is also applicable, wherein rezoning applications may be only considered under limited situations.  Specifically, Policy 2 is applicable, wherein rezoning applications will be considered for projects involving 100% social and supportive housing, or community care facilities or group residences.  

    With respect to the property at 325 E. 6th Avenue, the current development potential of this site is limited to what is allowable under the existing zone (RM-4) – FSR 1.45 and height of 10.7m.  Further, the site also falls under the Broadway Planning area and the future development potential of 325 E.6th Avenue is currently unknown as the Broadway Planning process has not been completed.