2246-2268 E Broadway rezoning application

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We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 2246-2268 E Broadway. The proposal is to allow for the development of a 6-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RS-1 (single detached houses and duplexes) to CD-1 (comprehensive development). The proposal includes:

  • 57 market strata units
  • Floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.65
  • Floor area of 4,216 sq. m (45,382 sq. ft.)
  • Maximum building height of 19.35 m (63.48 ft.)
  • 47 underground vehicle parking spaces, 4 surface vehicles parking spaces, and 114 bicycle parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.

E Broadway & Garden Rezoning Model by OmicronAEC on Sketchfab


Green: Other rezoning applications
Pink: What is permitted under rezoning policy




We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 2246-2268 E Broadway. The proposal is to allow for the development of a 6-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RS-1 (single detached houses and duplexes) to CD-1 (comprehensive development). The proposal includes:

  • 57 market strata units
  • Floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.65
  • Floor area of 4,216 sq. m (45,382 sq. ft.)
  • Maximum building height of 19.35 m (63.48 ft.)
  • 47 underground vehicle parking spaces, 4 surface vehicles parking spaces, and 114 bicycle parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.

E Broadway & Garden Rezoning Model by OmicronAEC on Sketchfab


Green: Other rezoning applications
Pink: What is permitted under rezoning policy



The virtual open house has concluded. Please use the “Send your comments” tab or contact the Planner directly for any further feedback. Thank you for participating.
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    To follow up on my previous question, why are 6-storey projects under the Grandview Woodlands Plan required to undergo an Urban Design Panel review, when similar applications under other community plans are not?

    Tavia asked 2 months ago

    6-storey proposals do not have to be reviewed by the Panel if they generally align with the built form guidelines in the Plan. This proposal varies from the front yard and building setbacks outlined in the Plan and therefore, feedback from the Panel was sought to confirm that it still met the intended urban design performance.

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    As the community plan envisions this type of development along this section of Broadway in the Triangle, why is this individual rezoning process necessary? Instead of requiring the applicant to fund this review, why not just allocate that money to other improvements in the community?

    Silent_Echo asked 2 months ago

    When the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan was approved in 2016, the decision to use site-specific rezonings to implement changes was informed by two key considerations: 

    1. An strong desire on the part of the community for additional engagement opportunities related to new development – and a recognition that the rezoning process provided more avenues for this than pre-zoning;
    2. The absence, at that time, of any 6-storey district schedules (the first, the RM-10 schedule, was only enacted in Joyce-Collingwood in early 2018).

    Since that time, a number of new applications have been received in this area of Broadway (there are currently five multifamily buildings approved or under consideration between Nanaimo/Victoria). While there are no immediate plans to pre-zone the area, the City recognizes that this could be one avenue to support Plan implementation. We have shared your email with the Planning Implementation team for their consideration.

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    Why was this proposal required to be reviewed by the Urban Design Panel? Based on their comments, will this proposal be allowed to proceed to city council, or will a new revised application be required?

    Tavia asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question. As per standard City practice, rezoning applications are taken to the Urban Design Panel for review. As a 6-storey project in the Grandview Woodlands Plan area, this project was reviewed for its response to the design guidelines in the Plan. The Urban Design Panel is an advisory body and provides recommendations and advice for both staff and Council in their review of the application. City staff are currently reviewing the recommendations from the Panel and determining next steps for this project.

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    In regards to my earlier question about parking, why is information about parking fees not asked of the developer? I realize that in the span of applications, approvals, etc., market values can change so what the asking price will be two years form now would be difficult to predict. But in regards to parking, I think that a developer should declare if a parking spot would be included. If a spot is not included many purchasers may decide to not buy a parking spot and park on the adjacent streets. Parking in the area of Nanaimo, Garden, 8th Avenue and Broadway can be at a premium as it is. With restaurants on Nanaimo (which is a 'commercial area' - I don't now how that compares to a commercial area such as Commercial Drive) coupled with some new housing in the area which includes a front and back duplex with a lane way house which includes onsite parking for garbage and green waste bins and a Smart car (if you're lucky), then throw in a Shaw To Go Bike stand, it can seriously overload the parking capacity in the neighbourhood. Yes, it would be alleviated by people taking transit but that still is wishful thinking. I will be quite dismayed if I have to purchase a parking pass to park in m y own neighbourhood. This is not the West End. In regards to building heights, you state that there was significant consultation. I attended the initial meeting regarding the Grandview Woodland plan (and several more) and I was hard pressed to hear people in support of 6 storeys. The discussion in the neighbourhood is still that 6 storeys is too high. Many of the four storey developments I have seen around the city are near transit and schools. (At the first Grandview Woodland Plan meeting, several people expressed that the city's mind was already made as to what the plan would look like. Even though the city provided opportunity for input, the input was not considered. This is greatly going to alter the look and feel of the neighbourhood. Is your thinking that eventually all of Broadway will be this high so it won't matter?

    Interested Party asked 3 months ago

    The City’s parking by-law regulates the provision and design of transportation elements on private property, including spaces for walking, bikes and bike parking, accessible parking, loading, passenger loading, and private motor vehicle parking. We regulate how much on-site parking a developer is required to build, but how that space is managed is up for the developer to decide as it can change based on their assessment of market conditions. For example, in strata buildings like this development, some buyers prefer to pay upfront to own a parking spot; but we are seeing more and more that some buyers would prefer to have the option of renting a parking spot because it can offer a significant savings on the cost of home ownership and car ownership rates are declining. 

    In addition, we have a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program which is a set of strategies aimed at maximizing the utility of sustainable transportation choices. It is used to manage traffic and parking demands and enhance the effectiveness of non-personal vehicle transportation. Developers have the choice to implement these TDM measures which will reduce the parking minimum requirements as per the City’s Bylaw and promote other effective and sustainable transportation methods such as cycling, transit, and car share.

    As part of our ongoing research on parking trends we have observed that many underground parking facilities remain largely empty, even in high demand areas such as the West End. Through the City’s Climate Emergency Response we are working on further promoting walking, biking, and public transit to reduce the overall demand for private motor vehicle use, and reducing the amount of parking supply to match that reduced demand. This will also help lower the cost of housing/construction, reduce the amount of embodied carbon in parkade structures, and enable more investment that support sustainable transportation. 

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    It’s weird that a rezoning is needed to build multifamily homes near transit. Are there any plans to pre-emptively rezone more of Grandview-Woodland to allow multifamily, instead of doing it project-by-project like this?

    gw_vancouver asked 3 months ago

    When the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan was approved in 2016, the decision to use site-specific rezonings to implement changes was informed by two key considerations: 

    1. An strong desire on the part of the community for additional engagement opportunities related to new development – and a recognition that the rezoning process provided more avenues for this than pre-zoning;
    2. The absence, at that time, of any 6-storey district schedules (the first, the RM-10 schedule, was only enacted in Joyce-Collingwood in early 2018).

    Since that time, a number of new applications have been received in this area of Broadway (there are currently five multifamily buildings approved or under consideration between Nanaimo/Victoria). While there are no immediate plans to pre-zone the area, the City recognizes that this could be one avenue to support Plan implementation. 

    We have shared your email with the Planning Implementation team for their consideration. If you wish to discuss the matter further, please feel free to contact Andrew Pask, lead planner for the Grandview-Woodland area.

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    Why is it so tiny? How does it possibly make sense after the city declared a climate emergence to only build six stories a few hundred meters away from the one of the most important skytrain stations in the entire lower mainland? Why isn't this a 60 storey building?

    sdlb asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Policy directions in the Plan were developed over a four year period and involved significant community consultation. The intent of Community Plans is to guide change and growth so there is a balance between accommodating growth and increasing livability. A range of housing types are permitted in the Commercial-Broadway Station Precinct, with higher building around the station precinct, with 6-stories along Broadway and rowhouses and townhouses to transition to lower-density areas. This is intended to provide a range of housing types, allow for growth and help manage change over time.

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    I have many questions.! The developer needs to redesign the building to make it look more like a garden and a commercial drive. It does not look like anything in the neighbourhood. Design it to look like that garden project around the corner. It needs quality building looks to look like the neighbouring houses. The building is also too big on the fifth and sixth floors. Make it like the corner building by reducing almost half of the upper floor. This would be a good idea to make sure all the buildings look the same. Or make it to townhome height that would be even better!! The building is too tall and and protrudes the view height limited. The building height should be reduced to address the view cone including mechanical stuff on top of the roof. Why it is so tall? Can it be smaller or at least reduce the upper floors like that other project.Make it less! Much less!! The building has too many small homes. Needs larger homes like corner project. This project will be too expensive for people to live here. The developer will make so many profits. I support the neighbours to stop developments that do not comply with the plan. We need to stop bad development. Stop it now. Construction is also an issue. The construction will block the lane. It will also block the broadway street. How will they put up a crane? What will happen to the children in the school? HOw will this affect the children? Will the shadows affect how they play? What about thecars? It will be difficult so we need a traffic study to confirm what will happen. Also use all of the community money in the community. How much of the community benefit money will be spent in the TRIANGLE? We need TRIANGLE money to upgrade the trees, streets, and to slow down traffic. A lot of speed bump all over the triangle would be great. ALso, change the speed limit to 30 km an hour everyone in the triangle!! This will make things safer. Please think of the children. Think of the community. Think of the TRIANGLE! - LIZ

    liznik asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Policy directions in the Plan were developed over a four year period and involved significant community consultation. The intent of Community Plans is to guide change and growth so there is a balance between accommodating growth and increasing livability. Most importantly, Community Plans aim to create a more equitable future for the neighbourhood. Specifically, the Grandview-Woodland Plan encourages 6-storey buildings on East Broadway in selected areas to provide family housing close to transit. 

    Building design is reviewed by the City and advice is provided by experts on the City’s Urban Design Panel on the architectural design of the building. The design is further refined through subsequent steps in the rezoning process. Setbacks on the upper stories on the lane have been provided to reduce shadowing and provide a transition to the neighbouring buildings.

    Construction impacts on City streets, including through private development, are tracked on the City of Vancouver’s website. The City also has a Noise Control By-law which regulates construction-related noise for private development (Weekdays 7.30am-8pm, Sat 10am-8pm, not permitted on Sundays/holidays). 

    As part of this application, the applicant provided a traffic report which will be reviewed by the City’s engineering department. In addition to providing 47 parking stalls for the 57 units, the site is well served by regular transit, and is within easy walking distance of the transit interchange at Broadway and Commercial Drive. Additionally, in 2017 City staff met with residents of the neighbourhood and undertook the Broadway Triangle Transportation Study. A summary of this study can be found here: https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/grandview-woodland-community-plan-transportation-background.pdf

    As a strata building, this project is expected to contribute a community amenity contribution (CAC) to address the impacts of rezoning which will be directed to support the public benefit and infrastructure outlines in the Grandview-Woodland Public Benefits Strategy.

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    Why is 6 storeys still being considered? I asked this question several years ago and received a response from a city councillor that 4 storeys (preferred in this neighbourhood if you have to build at all) doesn't generate enough rentals. Yet, I see many new buildings going up around the city that are only 4 storeys. I realize the Grandview-Woodland Plan allows for 6 storeys but that doesn't mean that someone should build 6 storeys. If the plan is to generate more rentals, why has the city approved only 4 storeys in may areas?

    Interested Party asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Policy directions in the Plan were developed over a four year period and involved significant community consultation.  

    The Grandview-Woodland Plan allows for consideration of a 6-storey building at this location regardless of tenure. The Plan includes policy intended to allow for a range of housing choices throughout the neighbourhood – including duplex, townhouse, low-rise, mid-rise and other housing types. While the Plan calls for more distributed opportunities for new housing throughout Grandview-Woodland, some areas – such as those close to the transit, on arterials, or close to other community amenities – were identified as key areas for future growth. This particular area is located between two commercial areas (Commercial Drive and Nanaimo/Broadway), and is also near to Trout Lake and several schools. The Plan encourages 6-storey buildings on East Broadway in selected areas to provide family housing close to transit.

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    Are the 47 underground and 4 surface vehicle parking spots included in the purchase price of a residential unit, or would a parking spot be an additional cost?

    Interested Party asked 3 months ago

    This project is currently in the rezoning stage and is under review by City staff. Rezoning timelines are typically 10-12 months and the final proposal will need to be approved by Council. Unit prices and associated fees such as parking for strata residential development is not part of the information we ask the applicant to provide. Price of the units is determined by what the market can support, and would depend on considerations such as unit sizes, unit layouts, locations in the city, unit features etc. and are determined by the applicant after rezoning approval.