2009-2037 Stainsbury Ave rezoning application

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We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 2009-2037 Stainsbury Ave. The proposal is to allow for the development of a seven-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RS-1 (Residential) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. This proposal includes:

  • 123 social housing units
  • A floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.46
  • A net floor area of 10,254 sq. m (110,368 sq. ft.)
  • A building height of 23.83 m (78.18 ft.)
  • Height to the top of the rooftop mechanical equipment of 26.80 m (87.93 ft.)
  • The height included in a future CD-1 Bylaw for this rezoning application is subject to change, pending staff review
  • 35 vehicle parking spaces and 227 bicycle parking spaces
  • Passive House certification

The application is being considered under the Kensington-Cedar Cottage Community Vision and the Affordable Housing Policies.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.


Online Public Hearing: Tuesday, July 5, 2022 at 6:00 pm

These Public Hearings are to be convened by electronic means, with in-person attendance also available. You may participate in the Public Hearing either by speaking by phone or in person, or by submitting written comments that will be distributed to the Mayor and Councillors.

Send your comments online

Request to speak by phone

Or give feedback via mail to:

City of Vancouver, City Clerk’s Office

453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor

Vancouver, BC, V5Y 1V4

Requests to speak open at 8:30 am on Friday, June 24, 2022 until 5:00 pm on the day of the Public Hearing. All spoken and written comments will be publicly accessible on the City of Vancouver’s website with your full name attached.

Copies of the draft by-laws will be made available for in-person viewing from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm on weekdays at the City Clerk’s Office on the 3rd Floor of City Hall from Friday, June 24, 2022, and for viewing on the meeting agenda page on the same Friday starting at 1:00 pm. Minutes of the Public Hearing will also be available at this location approximately two business days after the meeting.


We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 2009-2037 Stainsbury Ave. The proposal is to allow for the development of a seven-storey residential building. The zoning would change from RS-1 (Residential) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. This proposal includes:

  • 123 social housing units
  • A floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.46
  • A net floor area of 10,254 sq. m (110,368 sq. ft.)
  • A building height of 23.83 m (78.18 ft.)
  • Height to the top of the rooftop mechanical equipment of 26.80 m (87.93 ft.)
  • The height included in a future CD-1 Bylaw for this rezoning application is subject to change, pending staff review
  • 35 vehicle parking spaces and 227 bicycle parking spaces
  • Passive House certification

The application is being considered under the Kensington-Cedar Cottage Community Vision and the Affordable Housing Policies.

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.


Online Public Hearing: Tuesday, July 5, 2022 at 6:00 pm

These Public Hearings are to be convened by electronic means, with in-person attendance also available. You may participate in the Public Hearing either by speaking by phone or in person, or by submitting written comments that will be distributed to the Mayor and Councillors.

Send your comments online

Request to speak by phone

Or give feedback via mail to:

City of Vancouver, City Clerk’s Office

453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor

Vancouver, BC, V5Y 1V4

Requests to speak open at 8:30 am on Friday, June 24, 2022 until 5:00 pm on the day of the Public Hearing. All spoken and written comments will be publicly accessible on the City of Vancouver’s website with your full name attached.

Copies of the draft by-laws will be made available for in-person viewing from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm on weekdays at the City Clerk’s Office on the 3rd Floor of City Hall from Friday, June 24, 2022, and for viewing on the meeting agenda page on the same Friday starting at 1:00 pm. Minutes of the Public Hearing will also be available at this location approximately two business days after the meeting.

​The virtual open house and Q&A has concluded. Thank you for participating.

The opportunity to ask questions through the Q&A is available from January 24 to February 13, 2022. 

We post all questions as-is and aim to respond within two business days. Some questions may require coordination with internal departments and additional time may be needed to post a response.

Please note that the comment form will remain open after the virtual open house time period. The Rezoning Planner can also be contacted directly for any further feedback or questions.

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    My Question: Why is the City not following its promise that this portion of Commercial Drive and the Victoria Diversion is neutralized from future rezoning applications for affordable housing? The City's Task Force on Housing Affordability was used for the rezoning at Hull Street just around the corner from this proposal. The Council report for Hull Street said, This is the second rezoning application within a 10-block radius (the first one approved was at 18th Avenue and Commercial Drive), thereby neutralizing this portion of Commercial Drive and the Victoria Diversion from future AHC applications. Following is the link to the Council report: https://council.vancouver.ca/20180619/documents/p2.pdf CD-1 Rezoning: 3560-3570 Hull Street and 2070-2090 East 20th Avenue – RTS 12620 Page 5 2. Policy Context Affordable Housing Choices (AHC) Interim Rezoning Policy – In October 2012, Council approved an Interim Rezoning Policy aimed at encouraging innovation and enabling real examples of affordable housing types. These examples will be tested for potential wider application to provide on-going housing opportunities across the City. This policy is one component of a broad action plan that responds to the recommendations of the Mayor’s Task Force on Housing Affordability by delivering a set of actions to address the challenges of housing affordability in the City. Rezoning applications considered under the AHC Policy must meet a number of criteria regarding affordability, location and form of development (see AHC policy location map in Appendix E). A maximum of 20 applications are permitted under this policy, and no more than two projects within 10 blocks along an arterial street. This is the second rezoning application within a 10-block radius (the first one approved was at 18th Avenue and Commercial Drive), thereby neutralizing this portion of Commercial Drive and the Victoria Diversion from future AHC applications.

    grn asked 5 months ago

    The proposed rezoning application at 2009-2037 Stainsbury Ave is not being considered under the Affordable Housing Choices (AHC) Interim Rezoning Policy.

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    Which units have been designated to fall in the 30% low income group, which are charged market rents?

    Chris Flerlage asked 5 months ago

    This application proposes to provide a mix of 50% of units occupied by households with incomes below housing income limits (HILs), 20% of units at shelter rate and the remaining 30% of units at market rents. The specific units that will be tied to each rental rate type has not yet been set and will be determined by the operator based on a need and demand analysis with consideration for the overall project budget.

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    Although another question was answered here noting that the gravel path on TransLink property will no longer be accessible to the public; this path or similar is shown in the rezoning booklet (i.e., pages 62-65). Can you please clarify what the path in the rezoning booklet is for? This has been a popular pathway for gardeners to access garden plots and neighbourhood families to walk with children and pets. Further, it is outside the project zone on TransLink property. How can developers make changes to this path, outside of impacts during construction which may be allowed by permit?

    Diane L asked 5 months ago

    This application does not propose any changes to the TransLink property. Any changes on that site would have to be coordinated with and approved by TransLink. This path is shown on the rezoning drawings as it is part of the existing context.  

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    What is the market rent proposed for 80% of the units by type i.e. studio, 12,3 and 4 bedroom apartments? Does the rent vary by floor and view?

    Chris Flerlage asked 5 months ago

    This application proposes to provide a mix of 50% of units occupied by households with incomes below housing income limits (HILs), 20% of units at shelter rate and the remaining 30% of units at market rents. Those 30% of units at market rents would have rents that would be set at the market rent for that unit type in the neighbourhood, as approved by BC Housing. The rents could potentially vary based on unit-specific characteristics, such as view. Exact rent rates for the market rental units are not known at this time.

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    What is the range of market rents proposed for the various types of apartments, which will apply to 80% of the units i.e. studio, 1,2,3 and 4 bedrooms and are the rents tied to square footage and floor i. e. higher for a better view?

    Chris Flerlage asked 5 months ago

    This application proposes to provide a mix of 50% of units occupied by households with incomes below housing income limits (HILs), 20% of units at shelter rate and the remaining 30% of units at market rents. Those 30% of units at market rents would have rents that would be set at the market rent for that unit type in the neighbourhood, as approved by BC Housing. The rents could potentially vary based on unit-specific characteristics, such as view. Exact rent rates for the market rental units are not known at this time.

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    I am a neighbor of Conrad apartment building on East 18th at Commercial Drive. Residents of that building are unwilling or unable to pay for parking and the parking garage sits largely empty I have been told. I have counted over 50 vehicles belonging to Conrad residents parked at various times in the 2500 block of Welwyn Street(8-10) ON ANY GIVEN DAY MOST IN EXCESS OF THE 3 HOUR permitted time under the by-law making it impossible for Welwyn Street residents to find any parking on Welwyn. What steps does the city propose if any to get residents to pay for parking in their building v. parking on the street for free and what if any rent controls will exist in relation to parking?

    Chris Flerlage asked 5 months ago

    Your concerns have been shared with the City’s transportation staff. The City does not regulate the parking rates for privately owned buildings.

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    This movement does not represent all Canadians. I have more support for all the truckers and other essential workers who are keeping society functioning rather than the folks making aggressive and unreasonable demands and blocking access to supply routes. “The applicant has advised that the current courtyard form of the building, which is in response to its close proximity to the SkyTrain, provides more liveable, quiet, naturally ventilated residential units and as such aligns with the applicant’s social equity values better than a conventional double-sided interior corridor.” The courtyard resembles a prison courtyard on a cell block where all sounds, pleasant or vulgar, will bounce there way to everyone’s courtyard facing windows and front door. Leading people congregate outside on the street and in the neighborhood and likely to cause confrontation between the residents. Has this courtyard concept at this height been proven to provide a liveable and quiet environment for residents? Have there been acoustic studies to understand the echoing impact and disruption to residents from the courtyard?

    KJD asked 5 months ago

    The applicant has advised that the proposed courtyard will contribute to liveability for residents of the building, by increasing social interactions among residents and by helping with overall temperature control of the building. Heat waves and increasing summer temperatures due to climate change make cool exterior spaces desirable and the housing operator has requested a range of exterior spaces to accommodate different needs and activities. During extreme heat events, young and old residents who may be susceptible to overheating, can take refuge in the courtyard. During warm spring and fall days, when direct sun is desirable residents can use the south garden on Stainsbury or the shared balcony areas in the courtyard as seen on page 24 of the rezoning booklet. As illustrated on page 10 of the rezoning booklet, the expected ambient sound levels in the courtyard is 7 - 20 dba lower than the surrounding levels on the south and north sides of the building. This result is expected for the following reasons: the highly insulated passive house envelope will prevent interior noise from disturbing neighbours; dual aspect units and in-suite ventilation give residents options for control of ventilation air - meaning they do not need to open interior courtyard windows when they want to listen to loud music that might disturb their neighbours, and the non-parallel sides of the courtyard will reduce reflected sound and as a result, the courtyard will not function like an echo chamber.

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    I have a few questions regarding the courtyard: 1. Based on my estimate, the courtyard on the narrow end is about 2 to 2.5m wide, and wider end is about 8 to 9m wide, is that correct? 2. The wider end is mostly occupied by an outside staircase? 3. On page 22 of the Rezoning Booklet, it shows the courtyard daylight studies. Does the summer refer to summer solstices? If that is the case, there are maybe two hours of sunlight in the courtyard on summer solstice, and the rest of the year, the courtyard has no direct sunlight? 4. To put it into perspective, the building is 24m tall. Wouldn’t this courtyard feel more like a well than a courtyard? Courtyard is only pleasant when the building height and the courtyard width are comparable. 5. Have the acoustic studies of the building considered the possibility of the courtyard acting as an echo chamber for any noise emanating from the apartments?

    hscott asked 5 months ago

    Please see the responses to your questions: 

    1. The courtyard, from building face to building face, is 5.9m at the narrow end, and 13.5m at the wide end. 

    2. If you refer to the floor plans, the outside staircase is located closer to the western side of the courtyard and is proposed to occupy a relatively small portion of the courtyard. Specific design details of the courtyard would be further developed at the development permit stage. 

    3. On page 22, summer refers to summer solstice. The applicant has advised that the courtyard materials, white cladding and frosted glass guards, are selected to reflect light from the upper storeys to the lower floors. The renderings are photorealistic and show reasonable levels of natural light in the courtyard. In the summer months, some shading is desirable to provide a cool space for young and old residents who may be susceptible to overheating. 

    4. From the rear, the building is approx. 23.8 m in height, however from Stainsbury Ave (the southern frontage), the building is proposed to be approx. 19 m. The courtyard will not have direct sunlight at all times and access to sunlight will vary throughout the year. The applicant has advised that  heat waves and increasing summer temperatures due to climate change make cool exterior spaces desirable and the operator has requested a range of exterior spaces to accommodate different needs and activities. During extreme heat events, young and old residents who may be susceptible to overheating, can take refuge in the courtyard. During warm spring and fall days, when direct sun is desirable residents can use the south garden on Stainsbury or the share balcony areas in the courtyard as seen on page 24 of the rezoning booklet. 

    5. The applicant has advised that, as illustrated on page 10 of the rezoning booklet, the expected ambient sound levels in the courtyard is 7 - 20 dba lower than the surrounding levels on the south and north sides of the building. This result is expected for the following reasons: the highly insulated passive house envelope will prevent interior noise from disturbing neighbours; dual aspect units and in-suite ventilation give residents options for control of ventilation air - meaning they do not need to open interior courtyard windows when they want to listen to loud music that might disturb their neighbours, and the non-parallel sides of the courtyard will reduce reflected sound and as a result, the courtyard will not function like an echo chamber.

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    Has any environmental assessment been done on the site? In the time that Cedar Cottage Garden has occupied the site and the area under the SkyTrain, there have been a number of native bee counts. About 7 species of bumble bee were recorded, which is a significant concentration. The garden was planted with species that support native bees of all kinds, particularly ground-dwellers which favour north-facing slopes. The immediate climate will be significantly altered by the shadowing of the proposed building. What steps have been taken to ensure that pollinators are protected?

    P. H. Finch asked 5 months ago

    An environmental assessment is not a requirement for this rezoning application, however landscape and urban design staff have been made aware of your comments and questions relating to the presence of pollinators on the site. Through the project review process, and in particular as design development progresses during the development permit stage, landscape and urban design could provide conditions relating to supporting pollinators on the site.

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    The booklet says the development has a 47% family unit target. There are no licensed full time daycare options in the area for infants and toddlers. The only option for 3-5 year olds is CEFA, which is expensive even for middle income earners. There are a lot of part time preschool spots, but that doesn't help the majority of families who need full time care and care for infants and toddlers. What is the City's plan to provide safe and affordable daycare spots to these families and the families already living the area?

    JenniferAF asked 5 months ago

    Despite historical underinvestment and support for childcare from senior government, the City of Vancouver has been a leader in childcare for nearly 40 years. Significant and ongoing efforts are underway to create opportunities with senior governments, the public sector, and non-profit partners to open up new space potential. It is anticipated that a more rapid increase in the number of childcare spaces and greater affordability can (and will) be realized through the recently announced senior government commitments and as childcare is more routinely recognized as critical infrastructure.

    The City of Vancouver closely monitors the need/supply for childcare in all age groups across the city and in specific neighbourhoods.  In Kensington-Cedar Cottage, the number of spaces is estimated to be sufficient to meet 25% of the area's needs for 0-5 year olds. In other words, childcare for 0-5 year olds is significantly under-supplied. Across all areas of Vancouver, childcare is in short supply. But a lack of supply is only one of a host of other challenges. A labour shortage of qualified childcare staff (certified Early Learning Childhood Educators – ECEs) is making it difficult for childcare operators to open and sustain new childcare facilities. And for those parents and families lucky enough to find childcare, affordability remains a challenge.  Commitment from senior governments is needed on a number of levels (i.e. capital funding, fee reduction, fair wages for ECE workers) to address the current shortage and huge systemic barriers. One key role the City plays is to continue to advocate higher levels of government for increased and sustained action. 

    When it comes to whether a development project like this one has childcare included, there are a variety of factors involved, such as other priorities (affordable housing), funding availability, urban design considerations, as well as the willingness of a developer to include childcare. Site size, orientation and the proposed  building form also play a significant factor, because of specific childcare licensing requirements (such as adequate indoor and outdoor space). 

    The City fully recognizes that quality, affordable, and accessible childcare is paramount for complete communities and that significant investment and effort is required. Thank you for your question and feedback; it helps to amplify considerations and concerns related to this, and future development projects.

Page last updated: 17 Jun 2022, 09:27 AM