1405 E 15th Ave and 3071-3047 Maddams St rezoning application

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This application was approved by Council at Public Hearing on July 6, 2021.

Please see updated renderings available under the Virtual Open House applicant boards here.


We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 1405 E 15th Avenue and 3071-3047 Maddams St. The proposal is to allow for the development of 6 -storey secured rental building. The zoning would change from RT-2 (Residential) to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. This proposal includes:

  • A total of 79 secured market rental units
  • A total floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.58
  • A total floor area of 4,557 sq.m. (49,049 sq.ft.)
  • A maximum height of 20.8 m (68.2 ft.)
  • 24 vehicle parking spaces and 135 bike parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Affordable Housing Choices Interim Rezoning Policy.


Revised Application (April 22, 2021)

A revised application was submitted following feedback from the community open house and further staff review. Key changes include:

  • Increased floor space ratio (FSR) to 2.71;
  • Residential unit count was increased from 79 to 82 units
  • Adjustments to building setbacks

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.


Please see updated renderings available under the Virtual Open House applicant boards here.


We would like your feedback on a rezoning application at 1405 E 15th Avenue and 3071-3047 Maddams St. The proposal is to allow for the development of 6 -storey secured rental building. The zoning would change from RT-2 (Residential) to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. This proposal includes:

  • A total of 79 secured market rental units
  • A total floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.58
  • A total floor area of 4,557 sq.m. (49,049 sq.ft.)
  • A maximum height of 20.8 m (68.2 ft.)
  • 24 vehicle parking spaces and 135 bike parking spaces

The application is being considered under the Affordable Housing Choices Interim Rezoning Policy.


Revised Application (April 22, 2021)

A revised application was submitted following feedback from the community open house and further staff review. Key changes include:

  • Increased floor space ratio (FSR) to 2.71;
  • Residential unit count was increased from 79 to 82 units
  • Adjustments to building setbacks

In response to COVID-19 (Coronavirus), an extended online question and answer (Q&A) period was held in place of an in-person open house for this project.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Q&A is available from October 19 to November 8, 2020.

Q&A replaces in-person open houses, which are on hold due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

We post all questions as-is and reply here within two business days. To find out when we reply to your questions, sign in or register.


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    The east 15th and Knight major intersection has reputation for being a high crash area. And the East 15th hill also has a reputation for car cashes, hazardous conditions and car abandonment due to unsafe conditions. It is almost a yearly tradition for four-wheel drive cars try and fail to drive up the east 15th hill and hills parallel to it. Police have even been on site, half a block from your development, for a 6 car pile that was abandoned there for the winter until it was safe enough in the spring for tow trucks. There should be a few CIBC claims and police reports on record. It is also not uncommon for people to park and abandon their cars in the middle of the roads on the hills from black ice. Many of us locals have media of this and of trying to help skidding cars in the neighborhood. Needless to say, it is dangerous to park on or near the hills in the winter. Many of us park at the bottom of the hill on flat ground around where your development would be. It is one thing to try to change the behavior of your residents in theory but it is another to give back to the community that you are rezoning in practice. Already existing congestion will only get worse as cars try to enter and exit via your parking structure's driveway. Are you going to allow residents access to parking in your structure during the winter? Parking around your site's development is already scarce from the other rezoned development.

    Regards, A Clark Park Neighbourhood Resident asked 12 months ago

    The development proposes to meet the Parking By-law and will include parking for residents and visitors of the building. As part of the rezoning review process, staff assess the transportation impacts and may include development conditions for off-site requirements to improve transportation operations and safety for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. These measures may include, but are not limited to, widened sidewalks, protected bike lanes, and signal upgrades.

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    with the addition of many new residents to an already VERY busy street (Knight st) what will you do to support traffic-calming? There are numerous semi-trucks (who often run red lights).

    Brianne S asked 12 months ago

    As part of the rezoning process, Engineering staff review the proposed development with respect to transportation impacts, and if identified, may include development conditions for off-site requirements to improve safety and transportation operations. These may include, but are not limited to, widened sidewalks and boulevards, protected bike lanes and signal upgrades. 

    The site is located in close proximity to transit, cycling, and public bike share infrastructure. The rezoning application proposes to meet the minimum vehicle requirements of the City’s Parking By-law, which includes provisions for visitor parking, passenger loading, and bike spaces. As part of the requirements to meet the Parking By-law, the applicant proposed a comprehensive Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Plan to be delivered by the site. The TDM plan includes, but is not limited to, improve bicycle parking and maintenance facilities, as well as public car share vehicles. These measures further encourage reduced reliance on vehicle parking and trip demand. 


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    How does the height of this building compare to the development across East 15th Ave.?

    Richard Murray asked 12 months ago

    This application proposes a building with a height of 20.8 m. The building across the street at 3120-3184 Knight St. has a height of 15.9 m. 


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    Hopefully you are able to build less parking to help with overall affordability. Do you have any data on vehicle ownership rates in rental buildings? I rent and don’t own a car – I’m sure this is a pretty typical scenario. What’s being done to try and promote a car-free lifestyle? Also – will this project allow pets? I think it’s really important to build pet-friendly buildings in this city so renters with animals are further restricted when it comes to finding a high-quality home. Thanks!

    Adrian G. asked 12 months ago

    The City has policies which provide for reduced parking requirements for buildings with good access to transit and those which provide Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measures that support walking, cycling and transit usage. These policies are intended to allow for a market-based provision of parking in new buildings which also support improved housing affordability. The subject development is electing to meet the minimum requirements of the City’s Parking Bylaw by providing of a TDM plan.  With a TDM plan, the site is eligible for up to 60% reductions to their vehicle parking requirements.

    It is anticipated that new residents will take advantage of public transit nearby, considering the sites location along TransLink’s Frequent Transit Network, which we believe will reduce demand for parking. The building has also been designed with a number of features that promote a car free lifestyle, including: ample bicycle parking (approximately 2 stalls per unit), a dedicated car share space and passenger loading area to promote the use of ride sharing services.

    The Metro Vancouver Regional Parking Study (most recently updated in 2018) summarizes parking space usage across the region for different housing tenures:

    • For both rental and strata buildings, the study found that  apartment parking supply exceeds use across the region
      • Oversupply estimate of 42% in strata buildings and 35% in market rental buildings
    • Apartment parking supply is lower for buildings closer to frequent transit network
      • Market rental housing near transit has parking utilization ranging from 0.35-0.72 vehicles per dwelling unit compared to 0.99 for sites further from frequent transit
    • Transit use is generally higher where apartment parking use is lower, especially for rental buildings


    The proposed building will be pet friendly. 


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    First, the 24 parking spots seems inadequate for the 79 market rental units. That represents 33% usage rate, far below the City of Vancouver's most recent 2018 regional parking study that shows the average market rental usage to be 72% (including market rentals within 400m of public transit). It appears inevitable that the neighbourhood will have to accommodate these new residents through street parking, displacing the current residents from parking in front of or near their own homes. I would ask that the City commission a parking study for this specific site to verify demand (eg, through a company like Bunt & Associates), or consider providing the neighbourhood with some additional measures to ensure parking availability (eg, residential restrictions, 2 hr limit on visitor parking). Second, I see no commitment from the developer for a Community Amenity Contribution. Has the developer not offered any or has the City not requested such a contribution? There are options to upgrade Clark Park, including perhaps a water play area, and/or the installation of exercise/calisthenics equipment. Certainly some improvement to the second oldest park in the City is called for, if the city is to approve the addition of 79 additional households to the neighbourhood. Regards, Brian

    Brian Duong asked 12 months ago

    The project will comply with the Parking By-law and has not been flagged as requiring a Transportation Assessment and Management Study. The proposed development is also within TransLink’s frequent transit network area with close proximity to several modes of transportation. The application will undergo review by Engineering staff through the typical rezoning process and if any transportation issues are identified, staff may condition improvements, commensurate with the scale of development. 

    City staff review the pro forma for the building to determine if any Community Amenity Contribution (CAC) is necessary in addition to the 79 secured rental units. Please refer to the Community Amenity Contribution Policy for Rezonings (https://guidelines.vancouver.ca/policy-community-amenity-contributions.pdf) to learn more about CACs and public benefits.